09 May 2016

Rock and Troll Monday


When I finished my first pair of Troll flip flops, The Lizard quickly suggested I make a Clint Eastwood-type poncho.

Is Indy Troll styling now with his new Southwest Ponchos or what?!?


A traditional poncho typically is a blanket or woven piece of fabric with a hole in the center for the head to come through. A poncho keeps the body warm. Ponchos have been used in the Andes region for more than 600 years and by the Peruvian people for more than 2,000 years.

Military ponchos made of water-resistant fabric and used as raincoats came into use in the 1850s. Many of the fashionable ponchos in my native state of New Mexico while I was growing up featured an opening between the neck and the edge.

Okay, so true traditional ponchos are supposed to be woven, not crocheted...


Nothing like a little post-Cinco de Mayo fashion show...






Next week, I'll be back to my regularly scheduled snowflake patterns. Did you miss the snow?!?

You may do whatever you'd like with ponchos you make from this pattern, but you may not sell or republish the pattern. Thanks, and enjoy!


Finished Size: 3x4 inches without fringe
Materials: Worsted yarn, size G crochet hook

NOTE: If making striped poncho, work each Row in a new color, and start and bind off each poncho edge (not neck edge) Row with a 2-inch tail for fringe. On neck edge, make tails 3.5 to 4 inches long and crochet over ends to poncho edge or weave in to poncho edge upon completion to form fringe.

Troll Southwest Poncho Instructions

Leaving a 2-inch tail for fringe, chain 14.

Row 1: 1 sc in 2nd ch from hook and in each ch across for a total of 13 sc; ch 1, turn.

Rows 2-3: 1 sc in each sc across; ch 1, turn.

Short Row 4: To begin shaping neck and right poncho front, 1 sc in each of next 6 sc; ch 1 turn.

Short Rows 5-7: 1 sc in each sc across; ch 1, turn. Bind off at poncho edge leaving 2-inch tail for fringe.

Short Row 8: Joining at back neck edge or 8th sc of Row 3 and leaving a 4-inch tail for fringe (crocheting over tail during this Row or weaving tail to edge upon completion of Row), 1 sc in each of next 6 sc; ch 1 turn.

Short Rows 9-13: To form back of poncho, 1 sc in each sc across; ch 1, turn. Bind off at end of Row 13 leaving a 2-inch tail for fringe.
If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original.

To form left front of poncho and leaving a 4-inch tail for fringe, ch 7.

Row 14: 1 sc in 2nd ch from hook and in each of next 5 ch for a total of 6 sc; ch 1, turn.

Row 15: 1 sc in each sc across; ch 1, turn.

Row 16: 1 sc in each sc across, ch 1 to form neck edge, 1 sc across each of next 6 sc of poncho back for a total of 13 sc; ch 1, turn. See photos below in sock yarn version.

Row 17: 1 sc in each of the next 6 sc across, 1 sc in next ch, 1 sc in each of next 6 sc across; ch 1, turn. See photos below in sock yarn version.

Rows 18-19: 1 sc in each sc across; ch 1, turn. Bind off at end of Row 19, leaving 2-inch tail for fringe.

NOTE: I made the striped worsted weight yarn version with 18 Rows instead of 19 to maintain my stripe pattern.


Troll Southwest Poncho Instructions (sock yarn version)

Materials: Fingering yarn, size E crochet hook

NOTE: Scraps of Noro sock yarn have the perfect texture and colors for this project and may even be felted upon completion for an authentic look and feel!


Leaving a 2-inch tail for fringe, chain 20.

Row 1: 1 sc in 2nd ch from hook and in each ch across for a total of 19 sc; ch 1, turn.

Rows 2-4: 1 sc in each sc across; ch 1, turn.

Short Row 5: To begin shaping neck and right poncho front, 1 sc in each of next 8 sc; ch 1 turn.

Short Rows 6-9: 1 sc in each sc across; ch 1, turn. Bind off at neck edge leaving 4-inch tail for fringe. Weave tail poncho right opening to poncho edge.

Short Row 10: Joining at back neck edge or 12th sc of Row 4 and leaving a 4-inch tail for fringe (crocheting over tail during this Row or weaving tail to edge upon completion of Row), 1 sc in each of next 6 sc; ch 1 turn.
If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original.

Short Rows 11-19: To form back of poncho, 1 sc in each sc across; ch 1, turn. Bind off at end of Row 19 leaving a 4-inch tail for fringe.

To form left front of poncho and leaving a 4-inch tail for fringe, ch 9.

Row 20: 1 sc in 2nd ch from hook and in each of next 7 ch for a total of 8 sc; ch 1, turn.

Rows 21-23: 1 sc in each sc across; ch 1, turn.

Row 24: 1 sc in each of the next 8 sc across, ch 3 to form neck edge, 1 sc across each of next 8 sc of poncho back; ch 1, turn.


Row 25: 1 sc in each of the next 8 sc across, 1 sc in each of next 3 ch, 1 sc in each of next 8 sc across for a total of 19 sc; ch 1, turn.


Rows 26-28: 1 sc in each sc across; ch 1, turn. Bind off at end of Row 28, leaving 2-inch tail for fringe.

Finish: If poncho was worked using a different color on each Row, fill in any fringe gaps by knotting folded 4-inch pieces of yarn along edges as shown.

If poncho was worked using solid color, cut approximately 16 4-inch pieces of yarn and knotting folded pieces along edges as shown.






For both solid and striped versions, trim fringe even along front and back.

If poncho is curly (all mine were), using rust-free pins, pin and shape and then spray with light water mist. Allow to dry thoroughly.

Fold poncho front around Troll neck as shown, and Troll is dressed to thrill!



4 comments :

  1. I like the trolls. Eastwood would be proud! I love the flip flops as well.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Of course you do, you spaghetti-western lover! ;)

      Delete
  2. All ready to go The Good, The Bad and The Ugly on someone haha

    ReplyDelete


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