31 December 2010

Project Blizzard

flowering spices in the kitchen
one of many
I can smile this big!
2010 Christmas presents done!
Makeover Madness
Makeover Madness
sparkly window blizzard
things that grow in winter
Pepper indoors in winter!
green in winter
new Photoshop plugins
My first wildlife in weeks!
Six weeks of Waterton!
I can smile bigger than ewe!
The Lizard helps me get the perfect Snowflake Monday shot
tiny beaded Christmas angel surprise from dearest sister Donna
new yarn!
The days are getting longer now, and that alone is reason to smile. I hope you found as many reasons to smile as I did during the final month of the decade.

Be sure to check out other Project Smile posts, and keep smiling! We're going to make it through one more dark month!

30 December 2010

The Wow Vow

fun, fun, fun under the sun
I got my 3,000 miles, but I didn't get my three peaks. In 2011, I'm upping the ante changing the rules...

I reached some of the goals I set for 2010. This also is the first year I haven't been terribly disappointed that I wasn't able to do everything on my "List."

Three distinct events this year have taught me some important lessons. Those lessons were drilled home a couple of weeks ago when a Sunday School lesson asked, "When you meet your Maker, how will you feel about the way you spent your life?"

I've been mighty proud when I've hit milestones I thought I couldn't reach and when I've proven naysayers wrong. I LOVE squelching that little voice inside that whimpers, "I can't!" I had a ton of fun trying to reach 1,000 miles in one month this year, and I'm still wearing my 3,000-mile Smile. I have a snowflake glimmer in my eye because I actually completed 70 snowflake designs this year. Finishing all the girly Christmas presents by November is a huge feather in my cap. Or should I say, my stocking???

Mount Guyot in Winter, heavily photoshoppedBut when you get right down to it, those things don't really make that much difference in the long run. What's really going to matter is that I spent time doing good for others, trying to make a difference in the world and trying to comfort friends and family when they suffer.

I do have some important goals for 2011. I'd really like to finish a quilt by the end of February for the Denver National Quilt Festival. That's one of the goals I didn't achieve in 2010 due to one of the distinct events this year that taught me to spend my time wisely.

I hope to get more miles on my bicycle next year than what I got this year, but the important thing will be to have fun riding when I do. The only concrete goals I'm setting for my bike are another 1,000-mile-month, riding to the start and home from the finish of Ride the Rockies (but we've got to get drawn first...) and making it to the top of Pikes Peak in August, which means staying in shape after Ride the Rockies this year. I failed that one this year because of Lesson Number Two. No regrets.

I hope to come up with 52 more snowflake patterns, one each week, and right now the goal is to get a picture of each one in front of a mountain it will be named after. But I have pictures of most of the peaks I hope to design flakes for, so if I can't get to the mountains for several weekends in a row, separate pictures of the flake and the mountain will suffice.

SoarI hope to finish Makeover Madness retouching in 2011 in time to go to Moab for Thanksgiving, but if I don't make it, I know I'm doing something worth my time, and that's what matters.

Getting Christmas cards out before December 31 next year is a set-in-stone goal for 2011. But I think I've accomplished that only three times in the last 12 years, so it's a goal, and I'm shooting for it, but don't shoot me if I don't make it. Again.

I hope to climb three 14ers, but it won't kill me if I don't make it. I know from experience. I failed that one this year, and I'm still alive and kicking.

I hope to learn something new in 2011, and I hope to finish more unfinished projects. Those are lifetime goals and always in progress.

I'm also hoping to improve my gardening skills and my garden next summer. Must have more fresh, home-grown tomatoes!

Marmots in the Spirit WorldOne of my unwritten goals for this year was to read scriptures. I'm very proud to say I accomplished what I signed up for! At the end of last year, I signed up for an email subscription beginning Friday, January 1, to scriptures through Daily Lit, which allows you (FREE!) to set your own goals, from a few verses to a chapter to several chapters per day, per week or per month, with the option of suspending the subscription during vacation or if you get behind. I'm a pretty fast reader and I love to read, but my truly leisure time typically is fairly limited. So I signed up for two chapters (or the equivalent thereof in case of long chapters) three times a week.

I expected I'd need to suspend the subscription during Ride the Rockies, but at the last minute decided not to, even though I had no email access the entire week, because I wanted to challenge myself to catch up when I got back home. It took me eight days to finish six days' doses, but catch up I did! I actually had more trouble staying current the last three months than I did all summer long. But I made it! I've never been more than a week behind all year long, and as of right this moment, I'm current, with one more day and one more email to go. So I'm carrying this project over into next year, and I intend to keep going until I've finished the entire book.

And that's it for goals, other than spending time with loved ones and friends. That's what I think I'm going to care about when I meet my Maker. It's a bit of a modification for a goal-driven gal like me, but I don't consider it a step down. In fact, I think I'll be much happier with this bit of streamlining for 2011. And isn't that what life should be about?

May the coming year bring you the happiness and fulfillment you need and deserve!
Dreamy Rose

28 December 2010

Wordless Wednesday

Hey, guys, I think we're going the wrong way.
Hey there, Sweet Thing...
You sure smell nice!
You had your chance.
Which way do I go?
Charge!
The Boss

Sock-cess!

Day 1I knitted socks! On two circulars! Two at a time!

I finally finished the last of my commitments to others at midnight the Sunday before Christmas. I finally was free to make something for me, which in this case, was a pair of knitted socks for My Lizard. I'd never knitted socks before, and I'd always been intimidated by a picture in a 1950s or so book given me by my grandmother when I was about 12. I guess back then, heel flaps were how people made socks. I didn't think I could make such socks with comfortable heels; I was afraid the ridges where I would pick up stitches would wear blisters on the feet of those for whom I knitted. So I never tried.

At midnight the Sunday before Christmas, I had only six days to get that final Christmas present done. The Lizard knew I might be late. He knew I was chicken, but that I wanted to give it a try anyway. I didn't have time to look for a pattern on my slow dial-up internet connection, so I winged it.

I cast on 16 stitches, split them in half on a circular needle, looped the starting stitch through the ending stitch and just started knitting, adding one stitch at each end of the two halves each round. When I hit 30 stitches on each needle, it seemed big enough, so I stopped shaping the toe and began knitting the tube that would be the foot. I worked for one hour and then went to bed. After all, I had to leave for work in about six hours...

Day 2I worked on the sock again during my commute to and from work. Monday night before Christmas, I asked The Lizard if I could try the mouse ear-looking sock on his foot to make sure I had the size right. You should have seen his eyes light up!

Like a role reversal of Prince Charming trying the glass slipper on Cinderella, I carefully pulled the needle-laden sock tip up over his toes, and the sock tip was about six stitches too big for his foot. Dang!

"That's okay," The Lizard said. "I'll wear them. Don't worry about it. I love the color. I love the feel."

He had picked the color. I'd bought four skeins of what I thought might qualify as manly colorways, and he picked a fifth, one with some gorgeous bits of turquoise buried in chocolately man tones. So that's what I'm using. If he likes it, by golly, it will be socks!

Day 3When I went to bed that night, I tossed and turned, wondering what I should do. I really didn't want his socks to be too big. I wanted them to fit. I also had gained enough confidence to muster the courage to try two socks at a time. I had been taking notes of what I was doing so I could make the second sock match, but working both at the same time would not only make the socks go faster (in theory), but the chances of sizing being identical would be far higher.

Dark and early Tuesday morning, I ripped out the sock and wound the skein into two nearly equal-sized balls before heading for the train for my morning commute. I cast on 20 stitches for each sock this time because I thought the first attempt was a little too rounded. I shaped the toes into 26 stitches instead of 30 on each half of each sock, which was decreased by eight stitches instead of six from the first try, hopefully making the new socks a little snug.

By the time I got to work, I had two tiny toes on two circular needles. They didn't look like socks at that point, but two toe shapings were growing at the same time and at the same rate. I deliberately started the socks one color apart because The Lizard said he would like them fraternal instead of identical twins. (He'd admired all the lacy crocheted socks I made all year long and apparently had grown attached to the mismatched concept.) I also thought that might make it easier to keep the right strands with the right socks as I worked.

Day 4I had a meeting Tuesday night and didn't get to work on the socks again until my commute on Wednesday, now just three days from Christmas. The Lizard was able to try them on that night, and holy moly, they fit!!!

The socks nearly doubled in size during my short commute on Thursday, and by Christmas Eve, I was almost to the point I'd been dreading all these years. It was almost time to turn the heels.

I'd decided, after studying the construction of my own cycling socks, that I wanted to try shaping the heel the same way, which I think is called short rows. We had a four-hour drive on Christmas Day, and two of those hours were enough daylight to knit away.

Working on the stitches only on the back half of each sock on just one circular needle, I worked back and forth instead of in the round, slipping one additional stitch on each side until I got down to eight stitches on each heel, then I worked back and forth picking back up one stitch on each end of each heel until all the stitches were back in service. Two more rows around, and I could see what I'd done. The heels were poochy, just like they were supposed to be!

Christmas DayI shaped the heels!!! I couldn't wait until we arrived at our destination so The Lizard could try the socks on again. It worked! I shaped heels! I shaped heels! I turned my first heels on my first try, without a pattern, and it worked!

I had one more hour of daylight during our drive home on Boxing Day, and I got to within an inch of finishing the calf ribbing. After unloading the car, eating dinner and getting settled, I finished the socks at midnight, and The Lizard wasted no time getting his feet inside them!

His smile and his warm tootsies are the second-best elements of this Christmas for me. He loves them! He loves my first pair of knitted socks!

My stitches aren't all uniform, and the socks are not perfect, but I learned so much, and the process was so enjoyable. Yes, I will make more socks. Lots more socks. Lots more knitted socks! With turned heels!

Now I've taken on yet another deadline project, but this one doesn't involve socks. My dear friend Shonna has a cousin expecting a baby in a couple of weeks. Shonna had begun crocheting a baby blanket but now is unable to finish due to complications resulting from ovarian cancer. I volunteered to finish the project.

The actual day of Christmas may have passed, but the giving continues. May we all keep the spirit of Christmas going throughout the coming year!

finished Christmas socks

27 December 2010

Snowflake Monday

Pyramid Peak at Sunrise

Now that the holidays have passed, we have to go back to plain old, naked, hungry snowflakes until Valentine's Day...

Well, not exactly.

This was another of my Pikes Peak inspirations. Naming snowflakes can become rather tedious. You can call only so many creations Crystal Ice or Snowy Beauty before the names get pretty darned boring. While trying to climb Pikes Peak on my bicycle last August, I realized Colorado has 59 names boldly and triumphantly waiting to be used on snowflakes. We have 59 mountains higher than 14,000 feet (Pikes Peak is just one of them). Because I was half a mile short of reaching the summit of Pikes Peak in the allotted time in 2010, getting to the top in 2011 is one of my most important priorities for 2011. Therefore, this coming year will be the Year of 14er Snowflakes on Snowcatcher. Each new snowflake will be named after a mountain.

Some mountains won't get a snowflake. We have two Wilsons: Mount Wilson and Wilson Peak. I'm not doing two Wilson snowflakes! I don't know that I want to do even one. Not sure I'm inspired by the name Sherman either, but it was my first successful winter climb, and right next to it are Centennial 13ers Gemini Peaks. Great name for a pair of flakes! (Our Centennial Peaks are the highest 100 peaks in the state.)

I'm also contemplating not using at least one peak name that probably would be considered controversial or taking sides unless I named another flake with the opposite name, even though we don't have a high peak by that name. (Legend has it the mountain namers DID have the very prejudice I choose to avoid, and that's allegedly why inequity exists in the peak names.) I'm not even going to share the names here, although I have climbed the specific peak to which I'm referring. Don't you just love intrigue?!?

We have two Crestones, but I might do two Crestone flakes for a variety of reasons, which I'll share when we get to those. We also have two Maroons, and those snowflakes are already in the works.

Colorado also has some gorgeous and powerfully named 13ers, too, so I plan to name at least a few flakes after them. Just the names of some of these peaks ignite ideas in my head. Jagged, Emerald, Thunder Pyramid, Jupiter, Treasurevault, Precarious, Twilight, Snowdon... and wouldn't you know it... We have a Crystal Peak and an Ice Mountain!

I may even have to design a flake to symbolize 13,113-foot Lizard Head. Guess why!

Pyramid Peak Snowflake and Pyramid Peak

We'll get an early jump on this new mountain project of mine with this week's Pyramid Peak Snowflake, which was named Motif Snowflake until I came up with this 14er idea. Pyramid is a more creative name, in my opinion! This snowflake features six little pyramid-shaped motifs.

Pyramid Peak is one of our lower 14ers at 14,018 feet but one of the more difficult to climb due to steepness, exposure and an overabundance of loose rock. Lance Armstrong likely has a great view of this picturesque mountain from his living room window outside of Aspen. This is one of the 14ers I may never be able to climb because of the degree of difficulty, yet I can't help but admire its beauty every time it comes into view.

Best wishes for a prosperous year in 2011!

You may do whatever you'd like with snowflakes you make from this pattern, but you may not sell or republish the pattern. Thanks, and enjoy!

Pyramid Peak Snowflake

Finished Size: 5 inches from point to point
Materials: Size 10 crochet thread, size 8 crochet hook, empty pizza box, wax paper or foil, cellophane tape, glue, water, glitter, small container for glue/water mixture, paintbrush, stick pins that won't be used later for sewing, clear thread or fishing line

Pyramid Peak Snowflake Instructions

Triangle Motif (Make 6.)

Make magic ring.

Round 1: 6 sc in ring, sl st in starting sc. Pull magic circle tight.

Round 2: Ch 9 (counts as 1 dc and 6 ch), sk 1 sc, dc in next sc, ch 6, sk 1 sc, dc in next sc, ch 6, sl st in 3rd ch of ch 9.
If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original.

Round 3: Ch 3 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc in same st, ch 2, 2 dc in same st, ch 6, * in next dc work 2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc, ch 6; repeat from * 1 more time, sl st in 3rd ch of ch 3; bind off. Weave in ends.

Snowflake

Make magic ring.

Round 1: 12 sc in ring, sl st in starting sc. Pull magic circle tight, but leave opening big enough to allow stitches inside it to lay flat.

Round 2: Ch 6 (counts as 1 dc and ch 3), * sk 1 sc, dc in next sc, ch 3; repeat from * around 4 times, sl st in 3rd ch of starting ch 6.

Round 3: Ch 6 (counts as 1 dc and ch 3), * 1 dc in next ch 2 sp, ch 2, dc in same sp, ch 3; repeat from * around 4 times, dc in same sp as starting ch 6, ch 1, hdc in 3rd ch of starting ch 3 to form 6th ch 3 sp of Round.
If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original.

Round 4: Ch 3 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc around hdc post directly below, ch 3, * in next ch 2 sp work [2 dc, ch 2, 2 dc]; ch 3; repeat from * around 4 times, 2 dc in same space as starting dc, ch 1, hdc in 3rd ch of starting ch 3 to form 6th ch 2 sp of Round.

Round 5: To join motifs, ch 3 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc around hdc post directly below, ch 5, * in next ch 2 sp work 2 dc, 2 dc in any ch 2 point of one motif, 2 dc in same ch 2 sp as previous 2 dc in main snowflake body, ch 5; repeat from * around 4 times; 2 dc in same space as starting dc, 2 dc in any ch 2 point of final motif, sl st in 3rd ch of starting ch 3; bind off. Weave in ends.

Finish: Tape wax paper or foil to top of empty pizza box. Pin snowflake to box on top of wax paper or foil.

Mix a few drops of water with a teaspoon of glue in small washable container. Paint snowflake with glue mixture. Sprinkle lightly with glitter. Wash paintbrush and container thoroughly. Allow snowflake to dry at least 24 hours. Remove pins. Gently peel snowflake from wax paper or foil. Attach 10-inch clear thread to one spoke, weaving in end. Wrap fishing line around tree branch (or tape to ceiling or any overhead surface) and watch the snowflake twirl freely whenever you walk by! Snowflake also may be taped to window or tied to doorknob or cabinet handle.

Pyramid Peak Snowflake

25 December 2010

24 December 2010

Merry Christmas!

Christmas in Salt Lake City
One clever card.

Make six-pointed paper snowflakes.

Say "Merry Christmas" in another language.

Make a Flake without crocheting!!!

Draw. (Nothing to do with Christmas.)

Animal Origami. (Nothing to do with Christmas.)

Elf yourself.

A jigsaw puzzle I built. (Took me 3:15, and I knew what the picture was...)

Just wild.

Totally awesome! (Nothing to do with Christmas.)

I want to crochet some of these snowflakes.

White Christmas in Denver - doesn't happen often

20 December 2010

Snowflake Monday

Christmas Stocking Snowflake
My plan for the past several months has been to compile my snowflake patterns into a pdf booklet once I reach 100 patterns. Or, well, 103, because I've done two I don't like and one I hate. (Remember the Ugly Flake?!?) The goal was to make the pdf available for a tax-deductible contribution to the Colorado Chapter of the National Multiple Sclerosis Society (which has now combined with Wyoming). I was planning for about February because that's when I typically get to register for the coming year's MS-150 (now Bike MS), and my contribution page would be set up.

Last week I received notification that I get to register for the 2011 ride TODAY!!! Woohoo!!! I raised $1,200 last year, so I am once again a Premium Pedaler, and I get to register before the event is open to the public. Apparently they've added a couple of months to the registration process!

I'm not quite up to 100 patterns yet. In fact, I'm working on #70 right now. I don't have enough time to compile all the patterns into one booklet this week. But I can do some of my favorites (or the most popular; what do you think?), throw in a bonus or two yet unpublished patterns, and make the pdf booklet available beginning next week. (Man, do I ever hate putting deadlines on myself!!!) For those of you who have had difficulty printing my patterns, the pdf pattern will not be white text on white background, nor will it be white text on a dark background. The pdf pattern will be dark text on a light background and will feature color photographs.

Christmas Snowflake
Today's Christmas Snowflake is an idea I've had in my head for a couple of weeks and finally had a chance to work up late last week. If you are making the stockings, please make sure to read the special note about the stocking patterns, which immediately follows the snowflake pattern.

This Christmas Snowflake, of course, may be made without the stockings, and the stockings may be added to other flake patterns with adequate space between spokes for the stockings to hang. I still have a few danglies after last week's snowflake, and this Christmas Snowflake is another perfect hanger for small store-bought crystal ornaments. (It's another hungry snowflake! Feed the hungry snowflakes!)

worsted weight Christmas stockingThe stockings also may be used as stand-alone ornaments for a small tree or as package toppers. Feel free to use a color other than red, too! You also may make the stockings with yarn instead of thread (and a larger hook, of course), which will result in three- and four-inch stockings that look great on the mantle or on a full-sized tree. This larger size also is perfect for tiny gifts for co-workers, babysitters, bus drivers, newspaper carriers, teachers, classroom treats and neighbors. (Feed the hungry stockings! Fill 'em with Christmas candy!)

The middle-sized stocking made of worsted weight yarn with a size G hook is a pattern I designed many, many moons ago while attending high school, and I sold those little stockings for a quarter each.

For your own little personal touch, you could make a tiny Santa hat for the top point of the snowflake. (I did not have time to make one and write a pattern, but I will if you really need it. Just ask.)

May the spirit of Christmas wrap around you and those you love this week and throughout the coming year. Merry Christmas!

You may do whatever you'd like with snowflakes you make from this pattern, but you may not sell or republish the pattern. Thanks, and enjoy!

Christmas Snowflake
Finished Size: 7.5 inches from point to point
Materials: Size 10 crochet thread in white and red, small amount of fuzzy white sports yarn, size 8 crochet hook, size 1 crochet hook, 5 6mm red beads, 10 smaller gold beads, optional fiber fill, empty pizza box, wax paper or plastic wrap, cellophane tape, glue, water, glitter, small container for glue/water mixture, paintbrush, stick pins that won't be used later for sewing, beading needle, clear thread or fishing line

Christmas Stalking Snowflake Instructions

Make magic ring.

Round 1: Ch 3 (counts as 1 dc), 2 dc in ring, ch 12, *3 dc in ring, ch 12; repeat 4 times; sl st in 3rd ch of starting ch 3. Do not pull magic ring too tight.
Round 2: Ch 3 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc in each of next 2 dc, 8 sc in next ch 12 loop, ch 18, 8 sc in same ch 12 loop, *1 dc in each of next 3 dc, 8 sc in next ch 12 loop, ch 18, 8 sc in same ch 12 loop; repeat from * around 4 times, sl st in 3rd ch of starting ch 3.

Round 3: Ch 3 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc in each of next 2 dc, sk 2 sc, 1 sc in each of next 6 sc, 2 sc in next ch 18 sp, 1 hdc in same sp, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1, sl st in top of dc just worked, 1 hdc in same ch 18 sp, 4 sc in same sp, ch 7, 1 sc in 2nd ch from hook, 1 sc in next ch, 1 hdc in each of next 2 ch, 1 dc in each of next 2 ch, 4 sc in same ch 18 sp, ch 10, 1 sc in 2nd ch from hook, 1 sc in each of next 2 ch, 1 hdc in each of next 3 ch, 1 dc in each of next 3 ch, 4 sc in same ch 18 sp, ch 7, 1 sc in 2nd ch from hook, 1 sc in next ch, 1 hdc in each of next 2 ch, 1 dc in each of next 2 ch, 4 sc in same ch 18 sp, 1 hdc in same sp, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1, sl st in top of dc, 1 hdc in same 18 ch sp, 2 sc in same ch 18 sp, 1 sc in each of next 6 sc, sk 2 sc, *1 dc in each of next 3 dc, sk 2 sc, 1 sc in each of next 6 sc, 2 sc in next ch 18 sp, 1 hdc in same sp, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1, sl st in top of dc just worked, 1 hdc in same ch 18 sp, 4 sc in same sp, ch 7, 1 sc in 2nd ch from hook, 1 sc in next ch, 1 hdc in each of next 2 ch, 1 dc in each of next 2 ch, 4 sc in same ch 18 sp, ch 10, 1 sc in 2nd ch from hook, 1 sc in each of next 2 ch, 1 hdc in each of next 3 ch, 1 dc in each of next 3 ch, 4 sc in same ch 18 sp, ch 7, 1 sc in 2nd ch from hook, 1 sc in next ch, 1 hdc in each of next 2 ch, 1 dc in each of next 2 ch, 4 sc in same ch 18 sp, 1 hdc in same sp, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1, sl st in top of dc, 1 hdc in same 18 ch sp, 2 sc in same ch 18 sp, 1 sc in each of next 6 sc, sk 2 sc; repeat from * around 4 times; sl st in 3rd ch of starting ch 3; bind off. Weave in ends.
If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original.

Note: The Rounds on these stocking patterns do not all start in the same place. Some Rounds begin or end at the toe shaping. If working like this is confusing for you or you don't like to count, use a small piece of thread in a contrasting color to mark Round start. Crochet over the marker or wrap it around the starting stitch, and pull it out on the following Round, moving it to where the new Round starts. Also, the number of stitches in each Round is important only in trying to make twin stockings match. If you don't mind your stockings being fraternal twins, don't worry about the number of stitches. Decreasing on one end of the stocking each Round will shape the toe, regardless of how many stitches are used. The top edge of the stocking may be worked in white thread or in fuzzy sports weight yarn. Worsted weight may be used, but you may have trouble getting a larger hook through your thread stitches. The final Round also may be worked by couching the yarn (using yarn needle, sew around each stitch in the final red Round) instead of crocheting the final Round. If making the stockings with yarn and a larger hook, do three or four Rounds of white, depending upon personal preference, and don't skip stitches. Chain 15 at the end of the final Round and join in final single crochet to form loop for hanging.

Miniature Christmas Stockings
Small Stocking (make 2)

With red thread and smaller hook, ch 4.

Round 1: 3 sc in 2nd ch from hook, 1 sc in next ch, 3 sc in next ch, turning and working along other side of chain to form stocking bottom, 1 sc in next ch (same ch as 1 sc on opposite side) for a total of 8 sc around. Do not join.

Round 2: Working in stitches of Round 1, 2 sc in each of next 3 sc, 1 sc in next sc, 2 sc in each of next 3 sc, 1 sc in next sc for a total of 14 sc. Do not join.

Round 3: 1 sc in each sc around. Do not join.
If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original.

Round 4: Dec 3 sc across next 6 sc (yo, draw up loop in next sc, draw up loop in next sc, yo and draw through all 3 loops on hook; 1 dec made), 1 sc in each of next 8 sc around for a total of 11 sc. Do not join.

Rounds 5-7: 1 sc in next sc, dec 2 sc across next 3 sc (yo, draw up loop in next sc 3 times, yo and draw through all 4 loops on hook; 2 dec made) (8 sc remain), 1 sc around 2 times. Sl st in next sc, bind off.

Round 8: Using larger hook, join white thread or fuzzy white yarn at back of sock, above heel. If using thread, 1 sc in each sc around for a total of 8 sc. If using fuzzy yarn, 1 sc in every other sc around for a total of 4 sc, adjusting as necessary to keep top of stocking even. Sl st in starting sc. Bind off. Weave in ends. (I did not weave in my white end. I left it out as a hanger.) Stuff lightly if desired.


Small Christmas StockingMedium Stocking (make 2)

With red thread and smaller hook, ch 4.

Round 1: 3 sc in 2nd ch from hook, 1 sc in next ch, 3 sc in next ch, turning and working along other side of chain to form stocking bottom, 1 sc in next ch for a total of 8 sc around. Do not join.
If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original.

Round 2: Working in stitches of Round 1, 2 sc in each of next 3 sc, 1 sc in next sc, 2 sc in each of next 3 sc, 1 sc in next sc for a total of 14 sc. Do not join.

Round 3: 1 sc in each of next 2 sc, 2 sc in each of next 2 sc, 1 sc in each of next 5 sc, 2 sc in each of next 2 sc for a total of 18 sc.

Round 4: 1 sc in each sc around. Do not join.
If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original.

Round 5: 1 sc in each of next 4 sc, dec 3 sc across next 6 sc, 1 sc in each of next 10 sc around for a total of 15 sc. Do not join.

Round 6: Dec 3 sc across next 6 sc, 1 sc in each of next 9 sc around for a total of 12 sc. Do not join.

Round 7: Dec 1 sc across next 2 sc, 1 sc in each of next 9 sc around for a total of 11 sc. Do not join.

Rounds 8-11: 1 sc in each sc around 3 times. Sl st in next sc, bind off.

Round 12: Using larger hook, join white thread or fuzzy white yarn at back of sock, above heel. If using thread, 1 sc in each sc around for a total of 11 sc. If using fuzzy yarn, 1 sc in every other sc around for a total of 5 sc, adjusting as necessary to keep top of stocking even. Sl st in starting sc. Bind off. Weave in ends. (I did not weave in my white end. I left it out as a hanger.) Stuff lightly if desired.

Large Stocking (make 1)

With red thread and smaller hook, ch 6.

Round 1: 3 sc in 2nd ch from hook, 1 sc in each of next 3 ch, 3 sc in next ch, turning and working along other side of chain to form stocking bottom, 1 sc in each of next 3 ch for a total of 12 sc around. Do not join.
If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original.

Round 2: Working in stitches of Round 1, 2 sc in each of next 3 sc, 1 sc in each of next 3 sc, 2 sc in each of next 3 sc, 1 sc in each of next 3 sc for a total of 18 sc. Do not join.

Round 3: 1 sc in each of next 2 sc, 2 sc in each of next 2 sc, 1 sc in each of next 8 sc, 2 sc in each of next 2 sc for a total of 22 sc.

Rounds 4-5: 1 sc in each sc around twice. Do not join.

Round 6: 1 sc in each of next 4 sc, dec 3 sc across next 6 sc, 1 sc in each of next 15 sc around for a total of 19 sc. Do not join.

Round 7: Dec 3 sc across next 6 sc, 1 sc in each of next 13 sc around for a total of 16 sc. Do not join.

Round 8: Dec 3 sc across next 6 sc for a total of 13 sc. Do not join.

Rounds 9-14: 1 sc in each sc around 5 times. Sl st in next sc, bind off.

Round 16: Using larger hook, join white thread or fuzzy white yarn at back of sock, above heel. If using thread, 1 sc in each sc around for a total of 13 sc and do 2 or 3 Rounds, depending upon personal preference. If using fuzzy yarn, 1 sc in every other sc around for a total of 7 sc, adjusting as necessary to keep top of stocking even. Sl st in starting sc. Bind off. Weave in ends. (I chained 3 at the end with the white and did not weave in the end.) Stuff lightly if desired.

Finish: Tape wax paper or plastic wrap to top of empty pizza box. Pin snowflake to box on top of wax paper or plastic wrap.

Mix a few drops of water with a teaspoon of glue in small washable container. Paint snowflake with glue mixture. Sprinkle lightly with glitter. Wash paintbrush and container thoroughly. Allow snowflake to dry at least 24 hours. Remove pins. Gently peel snowflake from wax paper or plastic wrap.

Insert threaded beading needle through bottom of large stocking and invisibly through stitches all the way to top back of stocking. Thread one gold bead, one red bead and one gold bead. Attach to bottom spoke of snowflake and secure. Bind off and weave end through snowflake. Repeat with middle stockings, attaching to spokes on either side of bottom spoke. Repeat with small stockings on either side of top spoke. For extra strength, dab tiny amount of glue on back of each snowflake tip where beads are attached and allow to dry. (I used needle to bring invisible thread through length of spoke and knotted again before binding off, and I re-stiffened all six long points with full-strength, not watered-down, glue.)

This is an extra heavy flake if you stuff the stockings. It may not twirl as freely as hungry, naked snowflakes, and with time, the weight of the stockings could cause the snowflake to need another round of stiffening. You may want to attach this one to a suction cup and display it on a smooth, shiny surface such as a window instead of hanging it by a thread on a tree. For a plain snowflake, however, the same instructions I've provided in the past apply.

Attach 10-inch clear thread to top spoke, weaving in end. (For extra strength, dab this with glue also and allow to dry.) Wrap fishing line around tree branch (or tape to ceiling or any overhead surface) and watch the snowflake twirl freely whenever you walk by! Snowflake also may be taped to window or tied to doorknob or cabinet handle.

Christmas Snowflake with dangly
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