04 November 2013

Snowflake Monday

Digital Snowflake Quilt

Being so busy for most of the spring and summer left me hungry for snowflakes. After finishing my 2013 calendar of organized rides, I unwound by making a new snowflake aboard the commuter train every day for five straight days.

When I presented this one to The Lizard (because he ooohs and aaahs over them just like I do, and that gives me all kinds of warm fuzzies), he asked how I keep from designing the same snowflake over and over again. He wondered if I ever duplicate patterns when I'm making up a new one.

I sure hope not! Hopefully they are all unique. I don't remember all the snowflakes I've designed, and I don't study my directory often enough to be able to visualize all 200 or so designs off the top of my head. But I do have favorites and very favorites, and I have yet to duplicate them.

I hope each snowflake stands out, even though that silly little thing called age sometimes gets the best of my memory bank.

You may do whatever you'd like with snowflakes you make from this pattern, but you may not sell or republish the pattern. Thanks, and enjoy!

Stand Out Snowflake

Finished Size: 4 inches from point to point
Materials: Size 10 crochet thread, size 8 crochet hook, empty pizza box, wax paper or plastic wrap, cellophane tape, water soluble school glue or desired stiffener, water, glitter, small container for glue/water mixture, paintbrush, stick pins that won't be used later for sewing, clear thread or fishing line

Stand Out Snowflake Instructions

Make magic ring.

Round 1: Ch 2 (counts as 1 dc); 1 dc in ring, * ch 6, 2 dc in ring; repeat from * around 4 times; ch 3, 1 tr in 2nd ch of starting ch 2 to form final ch 6 sp of Round. Pull magic circle tight, but leave opening big enough to allow stitches inside it to lay flat.

Round 2: 5 sc over post of tr just worked, * ch 1, 9 sc in next ch 6 sp; repeat from * around 4 times; ch 1, 4 sc in next ch 6 sp; st st in starting sc.
If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original.

Round 3: Ch 6 (counts as 1 dc and ch 3), 1 dc in same st as sl st, * ch 5, 1 sc in 2nd ch from hook (picot made), ch 3, 1 dc in middle (5th/top) sc of next 9/sc group, ch 3, 1 dc in same st, ch 5, 1 dc in same st, ch 3, 1 dc in same st; repeat from * around 4 times; ch 5, 1 sc in 2nd ch from hook, ch 3, 1 dc in same ch as starting dc, ch 3, 1 dc in same ch, ch 2, 1 tr in 3rd ch of starting ch 6 to form final ch 5 sp of Round.

Round 4: Ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 4 dc over post of tr just worked, * ch 10, sl st in 3rd ch from hook, 1 sc in next ch, 1 hdc in next ch, 1 dc in next ch (pointy tip made), ch 4, 9 dc in next ch 5 sp; repeat from * around 5 times, omitting last 5 dc of final repeat; st st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2; bind off. Weave in ends.

Finish: Tape wax paper or plastic wrap to top of empty pizza box. Pin snowflake to box on top of wax paper or plastic wrap.

A link to the blocking template I use is located here. That website has some of the most helpful snowflake information I know of. I also have a link to it on my sidebar to the right. I try to keep all the important links there so everyone will be able to find the information they need.

If using glue, mix a few drops of water with a teaspoon of glue in small washable container. Paint snowflake with glue mixture or desired stiffener. Sprinkle lightly with glitter. Wash paintbrush and container thoroughly. Allow snowflake to dry at least 24 hours. Remove pins. Gently peel snowflake from wax paper or plastic wrap. Attach 10-inch clear thread to one spoke, weaving in end. Wrap fishing line around tree branch (or tape to ceiling or any overhead surface) and watch the snowflake twirl freely whenever you walk by! Snowflake also may be taped to window or tied to doorknob or cabinet handle.

Stand Out Snowflake Rock

Stand Out Snowflake Rock

14 comments:

  1. Good Monday Morning! I always look forward to my first cup of coffee and sitting down to see your newest snowflake! I have not noticed any two exactly alike. Wondering if your favs are because of what you named them for or their design? I have several of my favorites of yours and when I sit down to make a dozen or so I usually include them in that dozen. I couldn't tell you what month or year they are from but I just flip through the pages in my notebook of snowflake patterns and find them over and over again. I try to do the most difficult first so my eyes are nice and fresh with no blurriness. thanks again for all you do to brighten our lives.

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    1. Thank you, Brenda! I'm going to keep you in suspense about my favorites because I have an upcoming blog post with THE revised list. I, too, make some of the favorites over and over. But mostly these day, I'm making new ones because I'm trying to get ahead. :)

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    2. I can't wait to see your list. My top two favorites are the first red mug snowflake and the October 19th snowflake. I really love the ones with separate arms vs the ones that look like 6 sided stars.

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    3. Thanks, Krista! I love all snowflakes... :)

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  2. Wow such beautiful snowflakes. Thanks for sharing.

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  3. The organization at the top, is awesome, quite the display at your bay

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Pat! That's actually a Christmas card from a long time ago, when I didn't even have enough flakes to make every square different. :)

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    2. I think your snowflakes could look similar to anyone who doesn't crochet and know the different stitches. Every time I look through your directory I always find something new that I overlooked. Thanks for sharing all your patterns. I always look forward to Snowflake Mondays!

      Okay, it's time for the name the snowflake game. Do you have patterns for:
      Row1, Column A
      Row 2, Column B
      Row 3; Column F

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    3. Thanks, Krista!

      Row 1, Column A: Not sure that's one of mine; I'll look this week, and if it's not a published pattern by someone else, I will write a pattern.
      Row 2, Column B: Yikes! It appears I have not written that one yet, although I will keep looking.
      Row 3, Column F: Boy, have you ever given me my homework today! I haven't written this one either.

      And I thought I had nothing waiting in the wings!

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    4. Lol, I'm sorry... or you're welcome? I've been making your snowflakes for the last few months so I am very familiar with them :)

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    5. Well, I found Row 2, Column B... It's in my first snowflake booklet. It's one of the bonus patterns that has never been published on my blog.

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  4. There will always be some kind of variation - I don't think it's possible for you to exactly duplicate a snowflake. What a great image at the top, and I love the yarn-background shot. This flake looks like it would lend itself to some creative blocking options! It has such a happy, starry look. :)

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Sue! I will have to try to play with the blocking options; I didn't try to see what different kinds of shapes I could get from this one...

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