24 June 2013

Snowflake Monday

Day Lily

Another round of snowflake rocks for the garden...

I keep finding more wonderful blue flowers, and I put snowflake rocks around where I plant the seeds so I can remember where to water. Plus, once the plants do grow, the crochet on the rocks (which did indeed last through last summer's extremely harsh drought and this year's winter and spring storms) helps modify summer temperature at ground level just a wee bit and retains moisture through the hot summer sun. Add to that how pretty they look in my newly xeriscaped* rock garden and how neighbors react to my unique front yard... Now you know why I keep making snowflake rocks for my garden!

Snowy Snowflake Rocks

* Xeriscaping is landscaping requiring less water than a grass lawn and minimizing run-off. The term was coined right here in Denver while I was still living in an arid area of New Mexico, and I learned there how to choose appropriate plants and build berms on sloped landscapes to reduce or prevent erosion.

Before we took out our grass (which wouldn't grow in our native clay anyway and which I was horribly allergic to), we were using quite a bit of water via sprinkler three times a week (water restrictions during drought conditions) in a wasted effort at trying to make the lawn green. Now, with our xeriscaping, designed by me and featuring mostly drought- and heat-tolerant plants, I use three gallons of water a day (in a watering can) to help our new plants get established.

As long as we don't have drought conditions like last year, I shouldn't have to water as frequently next summer if my lavender, salvia, forget-me-nots, daisies and asters develop good root systems this year. I never have to water my pampas grass, day lilies, hyacinths, grape hyacinths, tulips and irises, and we never have to use the inefficient sprinkler system now.

I got the idea for the crocheted rocks for the garden from cycling jerseys, believe it or not. Jerseys are not made of cotton because cotton soaks up sweat and keeps it right next to the skin, muggy and miserable. If cotton does that to skin, I thought, perhaps it might have the same effect in the garden. My theory appears to be correct. Rain from a storm still saturates the crochet on the rocks several hours after the sun comes out. The plants seem to love the humidity created by the covered rocks, too.

Oh, and I LOVE spending time in my front yard now. Every day!

You may do whatever you'd like with snowflakes you make from this pattern, but you may not sell or republish the pattern. Thanks, and enjoy!

Puff, the Magic Snowflake

Frozen Crocodile Tears

Many Many Thunders

Victoria Blue Salvia

Blue My Mind

Day Lily and Hyacinth

Day Lily

Finished Size: 1st Snowflake, 1.5 inches from point to point, 2nd Snowflake, 2.25 inches from point to point, 3rd Snowflake, 2.5 inches from point to point
Materials: Size 10 crochet thread, size 8 crochet hook, empty pizza box, wax paper or plastic wrap, cellophane tape, water soluble school glue or desired stiffener, water, glitter, small container for glue/water mixture, paintbrush, stick pins that won't be used later for sewing, clear thread or fishing line

Garden Snowflake 5

Garden Snowflake 5 Instructions

Make magic ring.

Round 1: 12 sc in ring; sl st in starting sc. Pull magic circle tight, but leave opening big enough to allow stitches inside it to lay flat.
If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original.

Round 2: Ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), * 1 dc in next sc, ch 3, 1 sc in 2nd ch from hook (small picot made), ch 3, 1 dc in 3rd ch from hook (large picot made), ch 2, 1 sc in 2nd ch from hook (small picot made), ch 1, 1 dc in next dc; repeat from * around 5 times, omitting last dc of final repeat; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2; bind off. Weave in ends.

Garden Snowflake 6

Garden Snowflake 6 Instructions

Make magic ring.

Round 1: Ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 2 dc in ring, ch 3, * 3 dc in ring, ch 3; repeat from * around 4 times; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2. Pull magic circle tight, but leave opening big enough to allow stitches inside it to lay flat.
If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original.

Round 2: Ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), *1 dc in next ch 3 sp, ch 3, 1 dc in same sp, ch 5, 1 dc in same sp, ch 3, 1 dc in same sp; repeat from * around 5 times, omitting last dc of final repeat; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2; bind off. Weave in ends.

Garden Snowflake 7

Garden Snowflake 7 Instructions

Make magic ring.

Round 1: 6 sc in ring; sl st in starting sc. Don't pull magic circle too tight.

Round 2: Ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc in same sc, * 2 dc in next sc, ch 3, 2 dc in same sc; repeat from * around 4 times; 2 dc in same sc as starting dc, ch 3, sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2.
If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original.

Round 3: Ch 5 (counts as 1 dc and ch 3), sl st in 3rd ch from hook (picot made), * 3 dc in next ch 3 sp, [ch 3, 1 sc in 2nd ch from hook (sc picot made), ch 1, 3 dc in same sp] 2 times, ch 3, sl st in 3rd ch from hook (picot made); repeat from * around 5 times, omitting last dc and last picot of final repeat; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 5 below starting picot; bind off. Weave in ends.

Finish: Tape wax paper or plastic wrap to top of empty pizza box. Pin snowflake to box on top of wax paper or plastic wrap.

If using glue, mix a few drops of water with a teaspoon of glue in small washable container. Paint snowflake with glue mixture or desired stiffener. Sprinkle lightly with glitter. Wash paintbrush and container thoroughly. Allow snowflake to dry at least 24 hours. Remove pins. Gently peel snowflake from wax paper or plastic wrap. Attach 10-inch clear thread to one spoke, weaving in end. Wrap fishing line around tree branch (or tape to ceiling or any overhead surface) and watch the snowflake twirl freely whenever you walk by! Snowflake also may be taped to window or tied to doorknob or cabinet handle.

Blue Me Away

8 comments:

  1. Like the patterns you made as you set them up, another great display

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Pat! I hope I can keep coming up with designs so I can fill my garden!

      Delete
  2. Wow, the salvia and "Blue Me Away" are breathtaking!

    Crochet to save resources - crochet to save water! Who'd a thunk it! Great deductive process too - from jerseys to cotton-covered stones. And they look so purdy. :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Sue! See you on Friday!!!

      Delete
  3. The snowflake rocks look so pretty in the garden!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, CameraGirl! I love 'em, too!

      Delete
  4. I want a picture of your yard as a whole so we can see what you have planted in there 'en masse', so to speak. Please? :) I love your snowflake rocks! We have a giant rock in our lot. I wonder if the Goatmother would crochet a big snowflake for it? :)
    By the way, please go and see the Goatmother's latest attempt at bird photography. Besides, she linked to you (expert that you are. :))

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Marigold! The full transformation and garden is coming. I'm just waiting for a few more flowers to bloom. It will be on a Wordless Wednesday. Probably in July...

      Delete


Dusty words lying under carpets,
seldom heard, well must you keep your secrets
locked inside, hidden deep from view?
You can talk to me... (Stevie Nicks)

All spam is promptly and cheerfully deleted without ever appearing in print.

I apologize for turning off anonymous posting for a while. Too much garbage coming through; hope to get anonymous comments turned back on after a short break. If you don't have a Google account and need to contact me, please use the email address in the sidebar. Thank you!

Related Posts with Thumbnails