15 April 2014

Susie Socks

Susie Socks in Spring

I finished these socks three years ago today and asked The Lizard if I should name them Tax Socks or Susie Socks. The Lizard's stomach turned at the sound of the word "tax." Who wants to memorialize an annual deadline that makes people sick to their stomach???

My youngest sister was born on April 15. My mom put my hair in pony tails that morning before she realized the baby was coming. Just a couple of hours later! To this day, that momentous occasion is still the family joke. "Don't let Mom put Deb's hair in pony tails! Someone will come home with a new baby!"

We lost my sister in 1991, and I miss her still. Last year, I created a snowflake in her memory. This year, I finally set out to write the pattern to the socks to post here on my blog her 41st birthday.

These socks were designed to coordinate with my Fall Blaze Hat, Cowlin' Around and Spring Stripes Fingerless Gloves. My initial pair of socks was made with Felici, which, sadly, was discontinued this year. I recently dug out another couple of skeins of Felici in a colorway my sister would have loved for a new pair. She was a purple fiend.

Susie Socks

Susie Socks

Susie Socks

You may do whatever you'd like with socks you make from this pattern, but you may not sell or republish the pattern. Thanks, and enjoy!

Susie Socks

Finished Size: With Felici fingering: 8.5 inches across bottom of sock from tip of toe to tip of heel, 7.5 inches from bottom of sock to top of cuff; 8-inch circumference around foot, 7-inch circumference around ankle; with Valley Yarns Franklin fingering: 9-inch circumference around foot
Materials: Approximately 400 yards of sock or fingering yarn; optional small amount of contrast color for toe, heel and cuff, if desired; size B crochet hook; size 2 circular or double-pointed needles; optional stitch markers
Gauge: With Felici fingering: 12 dc=2 inches; 9 rows of pattern stitch or ldc=3 inches; 18 stitches in k2/p2 rib=2 inches, with adequate ease; 12 rows of k2/p2 rib=1.5 inches; with Valley Yarns Franklin fingering: 10 dc=2 inches; 10 rows of pattern stitch or ldc=4 inches
IMPORTANT NOTES: These socks are crocheted in the round, toe up, with a crocheted afterthought heel and a knitted rib cuff. I did not and do not plan to write an adjustment for a crocheted rib cuff because I prefer the look, feel and fit of a knitted rib. However, crocheters are welcome to independently adapt the ribbing to meet their own specific needs and preferences. A crocheted ribbing video tutorial is available here.

This pattern is designed to fit a woman or girl with size 6-7 feet, and crocheters are encouraged to try the sock several times during construction to check fit. Making the socks smaller or bigger is easiest to achieve by using a smaller or larger hook and perhaps even a thinner or thicker yarn. For instance, Felici is on the very thin side of fingering. Using a thicker fingering yarn with a size C crochet hook will increase the size of the sock. I started a sock in thicker Valley Yarns using the same size B hook I used with the Felici to compare the size difference, and just that small adaptation is making the sock big enough for size 8-10 feet. I would have to adapt the pattern to make it smaller to fit my feet if I used a thicker yarn!

The pattern may be adapted for larger or smaller feet by swatching, checking gauge and adjusting the number of stitches in the sock, adding or subtracting linked double crochet stitches on the sole of the foot, shorter or longer feet by decreasing or increasing the number of rounds in the foot section, or shorter or longer on the leg by decreasing or increasing the number of rounds in the leg section. To make the leg section thinner or thicker is more challenging due to the stitch count required by the pattern repeat, as each horizontal repeat measures approximately 1 inch.


Felici compared to Valley Yarns Franklin
Felici fingering compared to Valley Yarns Franklin fingering

Felici compared to Valley Yarns Franklin
Felici fingering compared to Valley Yarns Franklin fingering

Check Fit Often
Check Fit Often

Susie Socks Instructions

With contrast color if making sock in 2 colors or in main color if using one color, ch 10.
NOTE: This pattern may be worked with a variety of starting chain techniques. My initial pair was worked with regular chains. The second pair was worked with foundation hdc, which I now like better because it provides more loop support and strength to stitches worked on both sides of the chain. The starting chain also may be worked with foundation sc.

regular chain start
Regular Chain Start

foundation hdc chain start
Foundation hdc Chain Start

Round 1, forming toe tip: 3 sc in 2nd ch from hook, 1 sc in each of next 7 ch, 3 sc in final ch; working on opposite side of ch, 1 sc in each of next 9 ch for a total of 20 sc; do not join on this round or any of the following rounds until instructed to do so. Mark rounds if desired.

Round 2: 1 sc in next sc, 3 sc in next sc, 1 sc in each of next 9 sc, 3 sc in next sc, 1 sc in each of next 9 sc for a total of 24 sc.

Rounds 3-8: Continue working sc in each st around, increasing 2 sc on each end of toe oval on each round for a total of 28, 32, 36, 40, 44 and 48 sc respectively. If working the toe in a contrast color, join the sock color here.
SIZING NOTE: To make the sock larger, continue working in the same manner until you achieve the desired size. Additional stitches will be worked in ldc for the bottom of the sock and will not be added into the lace pattern on the top half of the sock unless a total of 16 st have been added, which will provide enough additional stitches to add a complete pattern repeat and the same number of stitches on the underside of the sock, but this will make the circumference of the sock an additional 3 inches around, for a total of 11 inches. That's a BIG sock. If making the sock larger than these instructions, additional stitches will be evenly divided on each side of the bottom or solid sock bottom.
AESTHETIC NOTE: Because crochet in the round migrates clockwise, I work my increases into the 3rd sc instead of middle sc of each increase group on every 2nd or 3rd round, but this is not necessary, just more aesthetic, in my opinion.

Round 9: 1 sc in each of next 2 sc (you should be at edge of toe oval; adjust as necessary if not); to begin solid sock bottom, ch 2 (does not count as dc on this round or on following rounds until otherwise instructed), insert hook into 1st ch and draw up loop, draw up loop through next sc, [yo and draw through 2 loops on hook] 2 times (linked dc or ldc made and forces the ch 2 to become part of the ldc fabric instead of standing alone), insert hook into middle of dc just made and draw up loop, draw up loop through next sc, [yo and draw through 2 loops on hook] 2 times (ldc made); 1 ldc in each of next 21 sc (or adjusted number of st if making sock larger); for lace sock top, 1 dc in next sc, [ch 1, sk 1 sc, 1 dc in next sc] 12 times, sl st in starting ldc.

A linked double crochet video tutorial is available here.

linked double crochet

linked double crochet

Round 10: [[Ch 2, insert hook into 1st ch and draw up loop, draw up loop through next sc, [yo and draw through 2 loops on hook] 2 times (ldc made)]] (repeat this step on each succeeding round of solid sock bottom rounds throughout and until beginning shaping for afterthought heel); 1 ldc in each of next 22 ldc (or adjusted number of stitches on this round and each succeeding round throughout bottom of sock); continuing with lace pattern,[1 dc in next dc, sk next dc, 3 dc in next dc, ch 2, 3 dc in same dc, sk next dc] 3 times, 1 dc in next dc, sl st in starting ldc.

Round 11: 1 ldc in each of next 23 ldc, [1 dc in next dc, ch 3, 1 sc in next ch 2 sp, ch 3, sk next 3/dc group] 3 times, 1 dc in next dc; sl st in starting ldc.

Round 12: 1 ldc in each of next 23 ldc, [1 dc in next dc, ch 1, 1 dc in next ch 3 sp, ch 1, 1 dc in next sc, ch 1, 1 dc in next ch 3 sp] 3 times; sl st in starting dc.
If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original.

Round 13: 1 ldc in each of next 23 ldc, [1 dc in next dc, 1 dc in next ch 1 sp] 11 times, 1 dc in next dc; sl st in starting ldc.

Round 14: 1 ldc in each of next 23 ldc, 1 dc in next dc, [ch 1, sk next dc, 1dc in next dc] 12 times; sl st in starting ldc.

Rounds 15-26: Repeat rounds 10-14, ending with Round 12 of lace pattern. To make foot longer, continue working in pattern until sock reaches base of ankle and start of heel pad. Adjust following round according to pattern if making sock longer.

Round 27: Ch 2 (does not count as dc); to form heel opening (which will be left open for now and closed at end of project), ch 22 (may be regular ch, foundation sc or foundation hdc); sk 23 ldc over entire solid foot bottom to lace st pattern on top of foot, 1 dc in 1st dc of lace stitch pattern, [ch 1, 1 dc in next ch 3 sp, ch 1, 1 dc in next sc, ch 1, 1 dc in next ch 3 sp, ch 1, 1 dc in next dc] 3 times, omitting last dc of final repeat; link final dc of lace pattern to starting ch 2 by drawing loops through ch to form ldc and forcing ch to become part of final dc as shown.

linked double crochet

linked double crochet

Round 28: Ch 2 (counts as 1 dc on this round and each succeeding round), 1 dc in each of next 22 ch, [1 dc in next dc, 1 dc in next ch 1 sp] 12 times; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2.

Round 29: Ch 3 (counts as 1 dc and ch 1), * sk next dc, 1 dc in next dc, ch 1; repeat from * around for a total of 24 dc; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 3.

Round 30: Ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), * sk next dc, 3 dc in next dc, ch 2, 3 dc in same dc, sk next dc, 1 dc in next dc; repeat from * around; omitting last dc of final repeat; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2.

Round 31: Ch 5 (counts as 1 dc and ch 3), 1 sc in next ch 2 sp, ch 3, * sk next 3/dc group, 1 dc in next dc, ch 3, 1 sc in next ch 3 sp, ch 3; repeat from * around sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 5.

Round 32: Ch 3 (counts as 1 dc and ch 1), * 1 dc in next ch 3 sp, ch 1, 1 dc in next sc, ch 1, 1 dc in next ch 3 sp, ch 1, 1 dc in next dc; repeat from * around omitting last dc of final repeat; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 3.

Round 33: Ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc in next ch 1 sp, * 1 dc in next dc, 1 dc in next ch 1 sp; repeat from * around; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2.

Rounds 34-37: Repeat Rounds 29-32 1 time or repeat Rounds 29-33 until sock is desired leg length. If continuing to make sock significantly longer and calf is much wider than ankle, increases may be necessary to achieve fit. Remember to increase adequately to maintain pattern, which is a multiple of 8 stitches. If working cuff in contrast color, join contrast color prior to sl st.

Round 38: Slide loop onto circular needles, draw up loop through each st around for a total of 48 loops (or a multiple of 4 stitches to maintain ribbing pattern if sock size has been adjusted).

Rounds 39-51: Work k2, p2 around for desired length of cuff; bind off, weave in ends.

Afterthought Heel

Round 1: With crochet hook and contrast color if making sock in 2 colors, 1 sc in 2nd ch (or foundation sc or foundation hdc) of heel opening, opposite of dc in same ch. 1 sc in each dc across to joint between ankle and foot, 1 sc in top of joint dc, 1 sc in middle of joint dc, 1 sc in bottom of joint dc, 1 sc in each ldc across to opposite joint between ankle and foot, 1 sc in top of joint dc, 1 sc in middle of joint dc, 1 sc in bottom of joint dc, 1 sc in next sc; do not join on this or any of the following rounds.
AESTHETIC NOTE: If the number of dc stitches and ldc stitches is not equal, you may decrease just 2 stitches on each joint in the following rounds until both sides of opening contain the same number of stitches; however, this is not required. The opening will be folded in half and whip-stitch closed at the completion of the afterthought heel, so the number of stitches on each side will not matter. I equalize the number of stitches on each side of an afterthought heel for aesthetic purposes. But who closely inspects the very tip of the heel of a sock?!?

Round 2: 1 sc in each sc across to joint between ankle and foot, draw up a loop in each of 3 joint sc stitches, yo and draw through all 4 loops on hook (sc decrease made), 1 sc in each sc across to joint between ankle and foot, 1 sc decrease across next 3 stitches.
NOTE: I draw up the second loop in each sc decrease through the middle of the middle sc of the preceding round to form the diagonal chain shaping, as shown.

diagonal decrease chain
diagonal decrease chain

diagonal decrease chain
diagonal decrease chain

how to diagonal decrease
how to diagonal decrease

Rounds 3-9: 1 sc in each sc across to joint between ankle and foot, 1 sc decrease across next 3 stitches, 1 sc in each sc across to joint between ankle and foot, 1 sc decrease across next 3 stitches.
NOTE: If you have increased the size of the sock, work this same decrease round until you have 8-10 stitches remaining on each side of the opening before binding off.

Finish: Bind off, leaving about a 4-inch tail. Turn sock inside out, fold opening in half and whip stitch across opening with tail, then whip stitch back across, further strengthening the seam. Weave in ends.
NOTE: Do not be tempted to sl st or sc across heel opening. This leaves a ridge that can be very uncomfortable to walk on.

Make another sock just like the one you just finished, and even if you used only one yarn color, there should still be enough yarn left over to make fingerless gloves!

Susie Socks

Susie Sock in Susie Purple

4 comments:

  1. Yeah I would not name anything after tax, unless it was the equivalent of what the cat leaves in the litterbox lol it is such a dirty word. Socks and matching gloves too, be stylin then.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks, Pat. Yes, taxes and kitty litter... they don't deserve any fiber love!!!

      Delete
  2. Those are so pretty - both pairs - but of course I like the purple ones best! :)

    What a great pattern, and thank you for all the work you put into writing it down and taking all those helpful photos.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I'm very partial to the purple ones, too, Sue. :) And thanks for noticing all the work that went into this. It was very intimidating because I've made about a million socks now, but I'd never written a sock pattern before.

      Delete


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