04 July 2011

Snowflake Monday

I just love fireworks!

One more foray into not-all-white snowflakes. (Actually, I'll probably keep making colorful snowflakes; I'll just be making more white ones than I have been making since about... winter...) Holidays inspire me. Fireworks inspire me. Colors, hikes and socks inspire me. Monster SocksSocks?!? Yes, socks! The master plan for this series of flakes was inspired by the 25 or so pairs of socks I crocheted last year to give as Christmas gifts. (This is the sock pattern I used.) I created the protype snowflake when flakes were still falling, back in winter, while trying to stock up on patterns I can publish during cycling season when I don't have as much time to design. When I designed this flake, I thought it would be a good Halloween snowflake because it was, after all, inspired by my Monster socks/Franken socks. Monster socks are created by using up yarn leftovers that don't necessarily go together. As I was going through my queue of snowflake patterns in search of something suitable for the marvelous reason we celebrate today, this pattern kept calling out to me. Coxcomb SnowflakeIt doesn't necessarily look like fireworks, but the prototype is an explosion of color. Color was elemental in designing this pattern. I'd just received my first order of hand-dyed thread, and ideas were exploding in my head like fireworks. This snowflake was one of the first things I cranked out. I used four different hand-dyed threads in one snowflake because I was anxious to see how they would look together. Next came the naming stage. We have an American Peak. I hope to climb it one day. But I think I'll save the name for next year's Independence Day snowflake because I thought of an even better and more appropriate idea for today. Six years ago yesterday, on Sunday, July 3, 2005, The Lizard dropped to his knee and popped the question in a beautiful Middle Fork basin lined by spectacularly dramatic peaks. Coxcomb Peak is perhaps the most predominate, and the improved points of my finalized pattern resemble, to me, a roster's comb. The Lizard's award-winning photo of sunrise over Uncompahgre Peak from atop Coxcomb kindled our romance. I'd had a crush on him for a good long while but thought no guy would ever like me. Turns out he'd had a similar attraction toward me but thought I was much younger than him. When his sunrise shot won a contest, I congratulated him, and the sparks (fireworks!!!) never stopped shooting after that. THE meadowThe Middle Fork of the Cimarron, where he took me specifically to propose, is a huge bowl surrounded by jagged peaks with fantastic names, some of which I will be drawing from for variations of this snowflake pattern. If you are a fan of old westerns, you might recognize the rugged mountain peaks as John Wayne's backdrop in "True Grit." The Cimarron skyline also is featured in "How the West Was Won." The skyline and autumn leaves within the Cimarron are among the most stunning views in all of Colorado. Judge for yourself... Redcliff and Coxcomb Turret Ridge El Punto Precipice Peak Autumn Color in the Cimarron This is yet another pattern that looks great stopping on any even-numbered round, so I made extras and gave them peak names from the Cimarron. El Punto just knocked one of my favorite snowflakes out of my top ten. I think this is the coolest tiny flake I've done in quite a while! I finished writing the last two rounds of Turret and the last four rounds of Coxcomb at 11:19 Sunday night after a day full of church and high altitude training rides on Vail Pass, so please be patient with me if my counting was off. I did my best, and I will fix any problems that pop up. Also, I hope this comes as exciting news. I've got a couple more renditions of the Coxcomb pattern coming next week. I've also been working on my first chart with this pattern, and I hope to have it ready by next week. Saddle up! Time to start crocheting! You may do whatever you'd like with snowflakes you make from this pattern, but you may not sell or republish the pattern. Thanks, and enjoy! Snowcatcher Fireworks Finished Size: 2.25 inches (Dunsinane Snowflake) to 7.25 inches (Coxcomb Snowflake) from point to point Materials: Size 10 crochet thread, size 7 crochet hook, empty pizza box, wax paper or plastic wrap, cellophane tape, glue, water, glitter, small container for glue/water mixture, paintbrush, stick pins that won't be used later for sewing, clear thread or fishing line Instructions El Punto Snowflake El Punto Snowflake Ch 3, sl st into 1st ch OR make magic ring. Round 1: Ch 3 (counts as 1 dc and ch 1), [1 dc in ring, ch 1] 11 times; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 3. Pull magic circle tight. If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original. Round 2: Sl st into next ch 1 sp, ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc in same sp, *ch 5, 1 dc in 3rd ch from hook, 1 hdc in next ch, 1 sc in next ch, ch 7, 1 dc in 3rd ch from hook, 1 dc in next ch, 1 hdc in next ch, 1 sc in each of next 2 ch, ch 5, 1 dc in 3rd ch from hook, 1 hdc in next ch, 1 sc in next ch, 2 dc in next ch 1 sp in main body of flake, 2 dc in next ch 1 sp; repeat from * around 5 times, ending with sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2 instead of last 2 dc of final repeat. Bind off. Weave in ends. Dunsinane Snowflake Dunsinane Snowflake Ch 3, sl st into 1st ch OR make magic ring. Round 1: Ch 3 (counts as 1 dc and ch 1), [1 dc in ring, ch 1] 11 times; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 3. Pull magic circle tight. If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original. Round 2: Sl st into next ch 1 sp, ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc in same sp, 2 dc in each ch 1 sp around; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2. Round 3: Ch 3 (counts as 1 dc and ch 1), 1 dc between 2/dc groups directly below, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, *ch 1, 1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 4, sl st in top of dc just worked (picot made), ch 1, 1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp; repeat from * around 4 times; ch 1, 1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 4, st st in top of dc just worked, ch 1, sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 3; bind off. Weave in ends. Heisshorn Snowflake Heisshorn Snowflake Ch 3, sl st into 1st ch OR make magic ring. Round 1: Ch 3 (counts as 1 dc and ch 1), [1 dc in ring, ch 1] 11 times; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 3. Pull magic circle tight. Round 2: Sl st into next ch 1 sp, ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc in same sp, 2 dc in each ch 1 sp around; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2. If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original. Round 3: Ch 5 (counts as 1 dc and ch 3), 1 dc between 2/dc groups directly below, ch 5, 1 dc in same sp, ch 3, 1 dc in same sp, *ch 1, 1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 4, sl st in top of dc just worked (picot made), ch 1, 1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 3, 1 dc in same sp, ch 5, 1 dc in same sp, ch 3, 1 dc in same sp; repeat from * around 4 times; ch 1, 1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 4, st st in top of dc just worked, ch 1, sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 5; bind off. Weave in ends. Fortress Snowflake Fortress Snowflake Ch 3, sl st into 1st ch OR make magic ring. Round 1: Ch 3 (counts as 1 dc and ch 1), [1 dc in ring, ch 1] 11 times; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 3. Pull magic circle tight. If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original. Round 2: Sl st into next ch 1 sp, ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc in same sp, 2 dc in each ch 1 sp around; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2. Round 3: Ch 3 (counts as 1 dc and ch 1), 1 dc between 2/dc groups directly below, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, *ch 1, 1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 4, sl st in top of dc just worked (picot made), ch 1, 1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp; repeat from * around 4 times; ch 1, 1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 4, st st in top of dc just worked, ch 1, sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 3. Round 4: Sl st in next ch 1 sp, ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc in same sp, *ch 5, 1 dc in 3rd ch from hook, 1 hdc in next ch, 1 sc in next ch, ch 7, 1 dc in 3rd ch from hook, 1 dc in next ch, 1 hdc in next ch, 1 sc in each of next 2 ch, ch 5, 1 dc in 3rd ch from hook, 1 hdc in next ch, 1 sc in next ch, 2 dc in next ch 1 sp in main body of flake, 1 dc in next ch 4 loop, [ch 3, 1 dc in same loop] 3 times, sk next ch 1 sp, 2 dc in next ch 1 sp; repeat from * around 5 times, ending with sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2 instead of last 2 dc on final repeat; bind off. Weave in ends. Precipice Snowflake Precipice Snowflake Ch 3, sl st into 1st ch OR make magic ring. Round 1: Ch 3 (counts as 1 dc and ch 1), [1 dc in ring, ch 1] 11 times; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 3. Pull magic circle tight. Round 2: Sl st into next ch 1 sp, ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc in same sp, 2 dc in each ch 1 sp around; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2. If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original. Round 3: Ch 3 (counts as 1 dc and ch 1), 1 dc between 2/dc groups directly below, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1, *1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1, 1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1; repeat from * around 4 times; ch 1, 1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1, sl st into 2nd ch of starting ch 3. Round 4: Sl st into next ch 1 sp (immediately next to final sl st of Round 3), ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc in same sp, 2 dc in each ch 1 sp around; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2. Round 5: Sl st into top of next dc, sl st between 2/dc groups directly below, ch 3 (counts as 1 dc and ch 1), 1 dc in same sp, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, *ch 1, [1 dc between next 2/dc groups] 2 times, ch 4, sl st in top of dc just worked (picot made), ch 1, 1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1, 1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp; repeat from * around 4 times; ch 1, 1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1, 1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 4, st st in top of dc just worked, ch 1, 1 dc between next 2/dc groups, sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 3. Round 6: Sl st in next ch 1 sp, ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc in same sp, *ch 5, 1 dc in 3rd ch from hook, 1 hdc in next ch, 1 sc in next ch, ch 7, 1 dc in 3rd ch from hook, 1 dc in next ch, 1 hdc in next ch, 1 sc in each of next 2 ch, ch 5, 1 dc in 3rd ch from hook, 1 hdc in next ch, 1 sc in next ch, 2 dc in next ch 1 sp in main body of flake, 2 dc in next ch 1 sp, 1 dc in next ch 4 loop, [ch 3, 1 dc in same loop] 3 times, sk next ch 1 sp, 2 dc in next ch 1 sp, 2 dc in next ch 1 sp; repeat from * around 5 times, ending with sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2 instead of last 2 dc on final repeat; bind off. Weave in ends. Turret Ridge Snowflake Turret Ridge Snowflake Ch 3, sl st into 1st ch OR make magic ring. Round 1: Ch 3 (counts as 1 dc and ch 1), [1 dc in ring, ch 1] 11 times; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 3. Pull magic circle tight. Round 2: Sl st into next ch 1 sp, ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc in same sp, 2 dc in each ch 1 sp around; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2. If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original. Round 3: Ch 3 (counts as 1 dc and ch 1), 1 dc between 2/dc groups directly below; ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1, *1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1, 1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1; repeat from * around 4 times; ch 1, 1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1, sl st into 2nd ch of starting ch 3. Round 4: Sl st into next ch 1 sp (immediately next to final sl st of Round 3), ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc in same sp, 2 dc in each ch 1 sp around; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2. Round 5: Sl st into top of next dc, sl st between 2/dc groups directly below, ch 3 (counts as 1 dc and ch 1), ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1, *1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1, 1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1, 1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1, 1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1; repeat from * around 4 times; ch 1, [1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1] 3 times, sl st into 2nd ch of starting ch 3. Round 6: Sl st into next ch 1 sp (immediately next to final sl st of Round 5), ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc in same sp, 2 dc in each ch 1 sp around; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2. Round 7: Sl st into top of next dc, sl st between 2/dc groups directly below, ch 3 (counts as 1 dc and ch 1), 1 dc in same sp, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, *ch 1, [1 dc between next 2/dc groups] 3 times, ch 4, sl st in top of dc just worked (picot made), ch 1, [1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1] 3 times, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp; repeat from * around 4 times; ch 1, [1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1] 3 times, ch 4, st st in top of dc just worked, ch 1, [1 dc between next 2/dc groups] 2 times, sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 3. Round 8: Sl st in next ch 1 sp, ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc in same sp, *ch 5, 1 dc in 3rd ch from hook, 1 hdc in next ch, 1 sc in next ch, ch 7, 1 dc in 3rd ch from hook, 1 dc in next ch, 1 hdc in next ch, 1 sc in each of next 2 ch, ch 5, 1 dc in 3rd ch from hook, 1 hdc in next ch, 1 sc in next ch, 2 dc in next ch 1 sp in main body of flake, [2 dc in next ch 1 sp] 2 times, 1 dc in next ch 4 loop, [ch 3, 1 dc in same loop] 3 times, sk next ch 1 sp, [2 dc in next ch 1 sp] 3 times; repeat from * around 5 times, ending with sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2 instead of last 2 dc on final repeat; bind off. Weave in ends. Coxcomb Peak Snowflake Coxcomb Peak Snowflake Ch 3, sl st into 1st ch OR make magic ring. Round 1: Ch 3 (counts as 1 dc and ch 1), [1 dc in ring, ch 1] 11 times; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 3. Pull magic circle tight. Round 2: Sl st into next ch 1 sp, ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc in same sp, 2 dc in each ch 1 sp around; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2. Round 3: Ch 3 (counts as 1 dc and ch 1), 1 dc between 2/dc groups directly below; ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1, *1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1, 1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1; repeat from * around 4 times; ch 1, 1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1, sl st into 2nd ch of starting ch 3. Round 4: Sl st into next ch 1 sp (immediately next to final sl st of Round 3), ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc in same sp, 2 dc in each ch 1 sp around; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2. Round 5: Sl st into top of next dc, sl st between 2/dc groups directly below, ch 3 (counts as 1 dc and ch 1), ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, *ch 1, [1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1] 3 times, 1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1; repeat from * around 4 times; ch 1, [1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1] 3 times, sl st into 2nd ch of starting ch 3. Round 6: Sl st into next ch 1 sp (immediately next to final sl st of Round 5), ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc in same sp, 2 dc in each ch 1 sp around; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2. If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original. Round 7: Sl st into top of next dc, sl st between 2/dc groups directly below, ch 3 (counts as 1 dc and ch 1), ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, *ch 1, [1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1] 5 times, 1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp; repeat from * around 4 times; ch 1, [1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1] 5 times, sl st into 2nd ch of starting ch 3. Round 8: Sl st into next ch 1 sp (immediately next to final sl st of Round 7), ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc in same sp, 2 dc in each ch 1 sp around; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2. Round 9: Sl st into top of next dc, sl st between 2/dc groups directly below, ch 3 (counts as 1 dc and ch 1), 1 dc in same sp, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp, *ch 1, [1 dc between next 2/dc groups] 4 times, ch 4, sl st in top of dc just worked (picot made), ch 1, [1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1] 4 times, 1 dc in same sp, ch 1, 1 dc in same sp; repeat from * around 4 times; ch 1, [1 dc between next 2/dc groups, ch 1] 3 times, ch 4, st st in top of dc just worked, ch 1, [1 dc between next 2/dc groups] 3 times, sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 3. Round 10: Sl st in next ch 1 sp, ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc in same sp, *ch 5, 1 dc in 3rd ch from hook, 1 hdc in next ch, 1 sc in next ch, ch 7, 1 dc in 3rd ch from hook, 1 dc in next ch, 1 hdc in next ch, 1 sc in each of next 2 ch, ch 5, 1 dc in 3rd ch from hook, 1 hdc in next ch, 1 sc in next ch, 2 dc in next ch 1 sp in main body of flake, [2 dc in next ch 1 sp] 3 times, 1 dc in next ch 4 loop, [ch 3, 1 dc in same loop] 3 times, sk next ch 1 sp, [2 dc in next ch 1 sp] 4 times; repeat from * around 5 times, ending with sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2 instead of last 2 dc on final repeat; bind off. Weave in ends. Finish: Tape wax paper or plastic wrap to top of empty pizza box. Pin snowflake to box on top of wax paper or plastic wrap. A link to the blocking template I use is located here. That website has some of the most helpful snowflake information I know of. I also have a link to it on my sidebar to the right. I try to keep all the important links there so everyone will be able to find the information they need. Mix a few drops of water with a teaspoon of glue in small washable container. Paint snowflake with glue mixture. Sprinkle lightly with glitter. Wash paintbrush and container thoroughly. Allow snowflake to dry at least 24 hours. Remove pins. Gently peel snowflake from wax paper or plastic wrap. Attach 10-inch clear thread to one spoke, weaving in end. Wrap fishing line around tree branch (or tape to ceiling or any overhead surface) and watch the snowflake twirl freely whenever you walk by! Snowflake also may be taped to window or tied to doorknob or cabinet handle. Coxcomb Peak Snowflake

19 comments:

  1. Goodness, what a post! I loved it ... the pictures are leaving me speechless. Such beauty. Words escape me. To have had "the" question asked in the midst of this beauty, such a treasured memory. The socks are great, the snowflakes ... a big wow and thanks for all the patterns. Talk about fireworks ... such an explosion here of love and creativity. Have a wonderful, blessed day.

    ReplyDelete
  2. Stunning views and lovely socks :)

    ReplyDelete
  3. Do you realize that you can use the t-shirt grocery bags as the surface cover, instead of waxed paper or plastic wrap, for bocking and stiffening your snowflakes? A great way to reuse something before recycling it. I use some foam core that I covered with contact paper. I am still using it after dozens of snowflakes.

    ReplyDelete
  4. Happy Anniversary to you and The Lizard. This post made me cry, then oh and ah, and lastly say WOW! Look at all those patterns on Snowflake Monday!

    ReplyDelete
  5. Thank you, Glor, Cat and Maria!

    Pack 813, that is a great tip! Thanks for sharing. I personally do not buy T-shirts (I receive more than my fair share from all the rides we participate in, and they don't come with packaging, thank heavens), but I have used grocery bags and vegetable bags. (Turn the print side under so it doesn't stain the snowflake!) I like the kitchen plastic wrap best because it sticks the least, and I do reuse, reuse, reuse... I'm going on ten years now with ONE roll of Easter-colored wrap! (You don't have to replace it every time you pin snowflakes, and sometimes you even benefit from previous glittering sessions when the old glitter adheres to the new flakes on the back side!)

    I was raised in a household where the common expression was, "There is no away." (For throwing things "away.") My grandmother reused her aluminum foil over and over and over until it was too charred to use any longer. And then it was put in the compost.

    ReplyDelete
  6. I have run out of compliments. There are too many beautiful things here and not enough words to do them justice! Beautiful, beautiful scenery and crochet and love story.

    The above commenter is right about the foam core - it's great for pinning flakes. I used it years ago - a big sheet of it came in very handy when we made hundreds of snowflakes as wedding favours for my niece.

    Great yarn bombing on that chain-link fence (behind the gorgeous socks). Your work or someone else's?

    ReplyDelete
  7. Thanks, Sue! You made my day!!!

    Sadly, that is not my yarn bombing. Here is a link to photos when the display was still fresh and colorful. (Winter took its toll on those bright colors, and a lot of the fancy pieces, such as blue birds, lady bugs and spiders, have disappeared.) Each of the photos is linked to a story about the commissioned project, the creators or general yarn bombing info. Only one of the links no longer works; the rest are still functional!

    ReplyDelete
  8. Congratulations to you and to Lizard! How fitting that photography started the fireworks... there's pure magic in that.

    ReplyDelete
  9. Happy anniversary! And happy 4th! Very late to the party I know, but hope you had a great day. And what a beautiful place to start your marriage, hats off to The Lizard :)

    ReplyDelete
  10. WOW! So, who knew the Brits could put on such an awesome, fantastically impressively inspiring (and did I say fantastic?) fireworks display?!? I love how they incorporated the Wheel. Thanks for posting the vid. And, by the way, I am also a snowflake fan (cotton, of course, not the icky wet stuff that falls out of the sky) and love yours since I'm not a designer. I make most of my "doilies" and snowflakes in yarn instead of thread just because I can't see the thread anymore. Then again, Mom keeps using the dishcloths I make for her as doilies, so what the hay?

    ReplyDelete
  11. Question...in the El Punto, looking at the picture it seems there should be another ch 5 "knob" after the ch 7 knob. Am I correct?

    Also, each begins with 11 dc in the ring, but the first ch 3 says it counts as a dc + ch1, and then in row two it says to sl st to the next ch1 sp..should row 1 be {dc, ch1} 11 times?
    I worked mine with no ch1 spaces and it came out fine.

    I love the snowflakes. Thank you so much for posting these!

    ReplyDelete
  12. Thanks, RebelAngel! It looks like you are correct on the missing knob. You also caught a biggie in that missing chain 1 step; you're good to have figured it out from the photo and then also making it work without the chain 1 spaces! I have fixed both, and thank you so much for telling me!

    Amazing that I've made this snowflake about 20 times now and never noticed the booboos. Just goes to show my brain does what it's supposed to do even when the eyes don't see the correct instructions. :)

    ReplyDelete
  13. GLORIOUS WORK!! You are a wonder! I am just learning to crochet with thread and it is challenging but very rewarding. I thought I would hate using such tiny thread and tiny hooks but I am really enjoying it and your site gives me great encouragement! THANK YOU for sharing your talent with us out here! ♥

    ReplyDelete
  14. Thank YOU, Judy, for brightening my Thanksgiving weekend. I finally had to break down and get reading glasses this year to keep going. You are right. It's so worth it!

    ReplyDelete
  15. i see how to make the snowflake but how do you change the colours? new to "more than white" crocheting

    ReplyDelete
  16. Hi, Sylvia

    If I'm using a different color on every round, I bind off and start the new round with whatever stitch the round calls for (if it says ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), I do a dc in the new color. Check out the Chainless DC Start video tutorial in my sidebar to see exactly how to do that. It works with any stitch, not just double crochet. If I'm alternating colors, such as using two colors, one on each row, I carry the thread not being used across the round where it's not being used with a twist to keep it from getting pulled too loose or too tight. I think there probably are video tutorials for how to do that as well, but I haven't looked for them because it's the same method used for intarsia knitting, which I already knew how to do before I began doing thread snowflakes with multiple colors.

    Using many colors in thread makes lots of tiny ends to weave into tiny stitches, but in my opinion, some of the thread projects in multiple colors are so attractive when complete, it's worth the extra (and sometimes tedious) effort.

    The nice thing about snowflakes is you can leave an end unwoven, stiffen the snowflake, and then clip the end close to the snowflake after it dries. A stiffened snowflake, in most cases, will not unravel.

    ReplyDelete
  17. buse.mary@gmail.com23 March, 2012 03:23

    I love your snowflakes!! Snowflakes quickly became the love of my life when I started to crochet them.I made 30 different ones, before I set out to stiffen them... Used so many pins! One snowflake alone needed 96 pins. Such a joy to watch the flake develop, and then to see the different possibilites while pinning them.Such delicate whispers of nature!I made them for inside decorating, hanging from my bay window, and on all of the live outdoor trees with lights...so fun! Designed a snowflake mobile (small and large =- 14 vs 100 snowflakes,hanging and spinning from a central doily taughtly attached to a doily strung inside a large ring. Dozens of spinning snowflakes around 30-36 inch diameter ring.... tons of fun!

    Thank you for celebrating the humble crocheted smowflake. My first experience of poor joy and delight - while admiring them all!!!
    Cheers to you and your snowflakes!
    Mary Buse Melick
    "Cascading Snowflake Mobile: SCk101: my first pattern book.
    Thanks for the trip down memory lane!

    ReplyDelete
  18. Beautiful! The El Punto Snowflake done with thicker cotton (medium,4, hook 3.50 mm) makes beautiful Christmas ornament (6 inch diameter). Pattern easy to remember. Thanks for sharing.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thank you, Anoushka! I would love to see a photo of your ornament!

      Delete


Dusty words lying under carpets,
seldom heard, well must you keep your secrets
locked inside, hidden deep from view?
You can talk to me... (Stevie Nicks)

All spam is promptly and cheerfully deleted without ever appearing in print.

I apologize for turning off anonymous posting for a while. Too much garbage coming through; hope to get anonymous comments turned back on after a short break. If you don't have a Google account and need to contact me, please use the email address in the sidebar. Thank you!

Related Posts with Thumbnails