03 November 2014

Snowflake Monday

Wind River Snowflake

This was the snowflake pattern I was writing when The Lizard suggested I name a snowflake Wind River, after the mountain range in Wyoming.

Gannet Peak is the highest peak in the Winds, as the range is called, and in Wyoming. If 194 feet taller, Gannet would be a 14er. It is the highest peak in the Rocky Mountains outside of Colorado. Mountaineers consider Gannet to be the most difficult state high point except for Denali in Alaska and Granite Peak in Montana.

Gannet Glacier, on the north slope of Gannet, is the largest glacier in the US. The name of another glacier on the mountain, Dinwoodie, also rests upon another mountain, a ridge, a creek and a group of Lakes. The name comes from Lt. William A. Dinwoodie of the U.S. Cavalry, once was stationed at Fort Washakie

Gannet was named for geographer Henry Gannet, father of the quadrangle.

With all this Gannet trivia, why not name the snowflake Gannet?

Because Wind River is such a beautiful name!

The Wind River Range is home to the country's only triple divide. The Continental Divide, which flanks the crest of the range, marks the dividing line between Gulf of Mexico and Sea of Cortez river drainages. Rivers within the Winds also take water to the Columbia Gorge and the Pacific Ocean, making this the only mountain range in the lower 48 states to carry water to three major drainages.

Although I could find no information on the naming of the Wind River Range, it's not difficult to figure out wind was involved. I-80 is lined by snow gates all along the Great Divide Basin (and almost throughout its length in Wyoming, as well). Wind is a way of life not only where I live, but in Wyoming as well.

Wind River Snowflakes

This snowflake evolved as I wrote this post. The first snowflake was a bit too confined for me, so I added a single crochet round at the start. Then, just to see how it would look with an even bigger center to stretch out the points, I made yet one more with a double crochet center. I like the second version best, which is the version I've shared here. If you like the first version best, omit the first round and start with the six popcorn stitches in the magic ring. If you like the third version best, use double crochet on the first round instead of single crochet.

I'm also attempting to convert this pattern into British terminology in the hopes of eventually gaining proficiency and confidence. I'm still very new at this language, so please be patient with me while I practice.

You may do whatever you'd like with snowflakes you make from this pattern, but you may not sell or republish the pattern. Thanks, and enjoy!

Wind River Snowflake

Finished Size: 3.5 inches from point to point
Materials: Size 10 crochet thread, size 8 crochet hook, empty pizza box, wax paper or plastic wrap, cellophane tape, water soluble school glue or desired stiffener, water, glitter, small container for glue/water mixture, paintbrush, stick pins that won't be used later for sewing, clear thread or fishing line

Wind River Snowflake Instructions, American Terminology

Make magic ring.

Round 1: 12 sc in ring; sl st in starting sc. Pull magic circle tight, but leave opening big enough to allow stitches inside it to lay flat.

Round 2: Ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 4 dc in same sc, remove hook from loop and insert in top of 2nd ch of starting ch 2, insert hook back through current loop and pull through starting ch (starting popcorn made), * ch 3, sk next sc, 5 dc in next sc, remove hook from loop and insert in top of 1st dc of 5 dc group, insert hook back through current loop and pull through 1st dc (popcorn made); repeat from * around 4 times; ch 1, 1 dc in top of starting popcorn to form 6th ch 3 sp of Round.
If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original.

Round 3: 1 sc over post of dc directly below, * ch 12, 1 sc in same sp, ch 5, 1 sc in next ch 3 sp; repeat from * around 4 times; ch 12, 1 sc in same sp, ch 2, 1 tr in starting sc to form 6th ch 5 sp of Round.

Round 4: 2 sc over post of tr directly below, * ch 3, 1 dc in 3rd ch from hook (dc picot made), 2 dc in next ch 12 sp, ch 3, 2 tr in same sp, ch 7, 1 dc in 7th ch from hook, ch 5, 1 dc in same ch, ch 6, sl st in same ch, 2 tr in same ch 12 sp in main body of flake, ch 3, 2 dc in same sp, ch 3, 1 dc in 3rd ch from hook (dc picot made), 3 sc in next ch 5 sp; repeat from * around 5 times, omitting last 2 sc of final repeat; sl st in starting sc; bind off. Weave in ends.

Wind River Snowflake Instructions, British Terminology

Make magic ring.

Round 1: 12 dc in ring; sl st in starting dc. Pull magic circle tight, but leave opening big enough to allow stitches inside it to lay flat.

Round 2: Ch 2 (counts as 1 tr), 4 tr in same dc, remove hook from loop and insert in top of 2nd ch of starting ch 2, insert hook back through current loop and pull through starting ch (starting popcorn made), * ch 3, sk next dc, 5 tr in next dc, remove hook from loop and insert in top of 1st tr of 5 tr group, insert hook back through current loop and pull through 1st tr (popcorn made); repeat from * around 4 times; ch 1, 1 tr in top of starting popcorn to form 6th ch 3 sp of Round.
If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original.

Round 3: 1 dc over post of tr directly below, * ch 12, 1 dc in same sp, ch 5, 1 dc in next ch 3 sp; repeat from * around 4 times; ch 12, 1 dc in same sp, ch 2, 1 dtr in starting sc to form 6th ch 5 sp of Round.

Round 4: 2 dc over post of dtr directly below, * ch 3, 1 tr in 3rd ch from hook (tr picot made), 2 tr in next ch 12 sp, ch 3, 2 dtr in same sp, ch 7, 1 tr in 7th ch from hook, ch 5, 1 tr in same ch, ch 6, sl st in same ch, 2 dtr in same ch 12 sp in main body of flake, ch 3, 2 tr in same sp, ch 3, 1 tr in 3rd ch from hook (tr picot made), 3 dc in next ch 5 sp; repeat from * around 5 times, omitting last 2 dc of final repeat; sl st in starting sc; bind off. Weave in ends.

Finish: Tape wax paper or plastic wrap to top of empty pizza box. Pin snowflake to box on top of wax paper or plastic wrap.

If using glue, mix a few drops of water with a teaspoon of glue in small washable container. Paint snowflake with glue mixture or desired stiffener. Sprinkle lightly with glitter. Wash paintbrush and container thoroughly. Allow snowflake to dry at least 24 hours. Remove pins. Gently peel snowflake from wax paper or plastic wrap. Attach 10-inch clear thread to one spoke, weaving in end. Wrap fishing line around tree branch (or tape to ceiling or any overhead surface) and watch the snowflake twirl freely whenever you walk by! Snowflake also may be taped to window or tied to doorknob or cabinet handle.

Wind River Snowflake

8 comments :

  1. Wow, never knew that. Anything mountain and snowflake you sure have down in your town haha

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We love research, Pat, especially when it has to do with mountains, rivers, snowflakes, forests, national parks... oh, I just ought to go for the gold and say everything!

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  2. Cool flake from the land of the wind.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Can you see this flake flying in the wind, Lizard?!? :)

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  3. I have only recently discovered "snowcatcher" and can't tell you how much I am enjoying it! Beautiful snowflakes, and photos and writing that transport me to places I'd love to visit! Thank you for the escapism, I am now busy creating a blizzard for Christmas near London xx

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Welcome, Kate, and thank you so much for taking the time to make my day! I hope the crocheted blizzard is the only one you get this Christmas, unless you want the real stuff... ;)

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  4. I like the puffy center on this one ... and I can just see these swirling on an icy breeze!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I've become addicted to the popcorn stitch lately, Sue. I go through stages; I went through a broomstick phase; I went through a hairpin stage, I went through a huge shell stage... now I'm enjoying popcorn!!!

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