22 December 2014

Snowflake Monday

Bandon, Oregon

I'd planned to use my second "Frozen"-inspired amigurumi today, but limited internet access and demanding work responsibilities have forced me to alter the Snowflake Monday schedule yet again. Maybe it's better this way; crocheters are still trying to crank out quickie snowflakes before Thursday, and the amigurumi I'd planned for today took me two weeks!

We hadn't planned to overnight in Roseburg, Oregon, following my nephew's Shady Cove wedding last month, but we couldn't resist a drive up the Oregon Coast, which resulted in lovely Bandon sunset photos. Roseburg also put us closer to our flight out of Eugene the next morning. I created this snowflake in Roseburg after a half day of the most inspiring beach photography.

Roseburg Snowflake

You may do whatever you'd like with snowflakes you make from this pattern, but you may not sell or republish the pattern. Thanks, and enjoy!


Finished Size: 6 inches from point to point
Materials: Size 10 crochet thread, size 7 crochet hook, empty pizza box, wax paper or plastic wrap, cellophane tape, water soluble school glue or desired stiffener, water, glitter, small container for glue/water mixture, paintbrush, stick pins that won't be used later for sewing, clear thread or fishing line

Roseburg Snowflake Instructions

Make magic ring.

Round 1: 12 sc in ring; sl st in starting sc. Pull magic circle tight, but leave opening big enough to allow stitches inside it to lay flat.

Round 2: Ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), [yo and draw up loop through same sc, yo and draw through 2 loops on hook] 2 times, yo and draw through all three loops on hook (starting cluster made), ch 3, * sk next sc, yo and draw up loop through next sc, yo and draw through 2 loops on hook, [yo and draw up loop through same sc, yo and draw through 2 loops on hook 2 times; yo and draw through all 4 loops on hook (cluster made), ch 3; repeat from * around 4 times; sl st in top of starting cluster.

Round 3: * 3 sc in next ch 3 sp, ch 3, 3 sc in same ch 3 sp; repeat from * around 5 times; sl st in same starting cluster as end of Round 2.

Round 4: Ch 5 (counts as 1 dc and ch 3), * 3 sc in next ch 3 sp, ch 3, 1 dc over sc into top of next cluster, ch 3; repeat from * around 5 times, omitting last dc of final repeat; sl st into 2nd ch of starting ch 5.
If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original.

Round 5: Ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), * 1 dc in middle (2nd) sc of next 3/sc group, ch 3, 1 dc in same sc, sk next sc and next ch 3 sp, 1 dc in next dc, ch 8, 1 dc in 8th ch from hook, 1 dc in same dc in main body of flake; repeat from * around 5 times, omitting last dc of final repeat; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2.

Round 6: * 2 sc in next ch 3 sp, ch 3, 2 sc in same sp, 6 dc in next ch 7 loop, ch 7, 1 dc in 3rd ch from hook (dc picot made), ch 5, sl st in 2nd ch from hook, 1 sc in next ch, 1 hdc in next ch, 1 dc in next ch, ch 3, 1 dc in 3rd ch from hook (dc picot made), sk next dc picot, 1 dc in next ch, 1 hdc in next ch, 1 sc in next ch, sl st in next ch, 6 dc in same ch 7 loop in main body of flake; repeat from * around 5 times; sl st in starting sc; bind off. Weave in ends.

Finish: Tape wax paper or plastic wrap to top of empty pizza box. Pin snowflake to box on top of wax paper or plastic wrap.

A link to the blocking template I use is located here. That website has some of the most helpful snowflake information I know of. I also have a link to it on my sidebar to the right. I try to keep all the important links there so everyone will be able to find the information they need.

UPDATE: Noel's website currently is inactive, and I've placed a new (to me) blocking template link in the sidebar to the right. It contains a vast collection of different templates for stars, snowflakes and snowflakes that do not have six sides. Meanwhile, I've contacted Noel to let her know her website is down. She has maintained her website at her own expense and on her own personal time for more years than I've been publishing my blog, and Tangleweeds has been a valuable resource for so many crocheters for many, many years. Please be patient as I attempt to resolve what I can. I cannot and will not publish someone else's copyrighted material on my blog as that would be copyright theft. If I obtain permission to republish a template not created by me, I will do so, but not until then. If it turns out Noel's website is gone, I will update all the links in all 300 or however many patterns it is I've already published as I have internet access, but that monstrous task is going to take quite a bit of time, so I politely plead for your patience until then.

If using glue, mix a few drops of water with a teaspoon of glue in small washable container. Paint snowflake with glue mixture or desired stiffener. Sprinkle lightly with glitter. Wash paintbrush and container thoroughly. Allow snowflake to dry at least 24 hours. Remove pins. Gently peel snowflake from wax paper or plastic wrap. Attach 10-inch clear thread to one spoke, weaving in end. Wrap fishing line around tree branch (or tape to ceiling or any overhead surface) and watch the snowflake twirl freely whenever you walk by! Snowflake also may be taped to window or tied to doorknob or cabinet handle.

Roseburg Snowflake

19 December 2014

18 December 2014

16 December 2014

Wordless Wednesday

Splash

November Reign

scattered

layered

Arch Rock

sea level

soothing

day's end

Sneak Peak

The Weather Turns Atop The Grand Mesa

Recently heard through the grapevine next year's Ride the Rockies will be "epic." I acknowledge epic is a word many newspapers would like to ban, but the word is a portion of a direct quote from a Power That Be. And I like it!

We're drooling in anticipation of February's 30th anniversary route announcement! We opted not to throw our hats in the RtR lottery last winter because there were only two stages we wanted to ride. As a result, we've been experiencing a degree of withdrawals all year long.

Thinking back on past "epic" stages, we're hoping at least a few repeats will be in the mix.

Coal Bank Pass

The most difficult RtR day I've ever pedaled was Ouray to Durango in 2010, three mountain passes with a grueling two-mile climb during Durango's rush hour at the end of the ride to the tent city on the Fort Lewis campus. With a headwind, of course. Oh, how I suffered that day! I had never done three mountain passes in a day before in my entire life (or since!), and that night, I wasn't sure I'd ever get back on my bike again. But the next day, I shocked myself when I got back on my bike and finished the tour. Now I can honestly say I'd do it again!

Atop the Grand Mesa

The second most difficult RtR day I've ever done has happened twice now. The Grand Mesa was featured in the 2005 Ride the Rockies and then again during the tour's 25th anniversary in 2010. The first time I did it, I bonked before the summit, which means I didn't eat and/or drink enough, and I underestimated the mileage. I thought I was at the top when I still had a good two more miles to go in depleted condition. I made it to the top, thanks to much encouragement (and a few back pushes) from The Lizard, but devastation nearly devoured me that day.

Day 2 Owie

In 2010, the Grand Mesa took a bite out of my derailleur and spit it out chewed up. I had completed the climb and was overjoyed but had to ride the rest of the way in a SAG wagon, one of the Support And Gear vehicles patrolling the route to assist riders. My second climb of the Grand Mesa wasn't as hard as my first, but emotionally, that day took a heavy toll on me, and I long to do the entire ride again in high style without bonking and without being a passenger in a SAG wagon.

sandy Rio Grande bike path

death before SAG, death before SAG, death before SAG...

King for the Day!!!

Mountain Boy Park from Independence Pass

new and improved method of tent sleeping

Independence Pass in 2012 probably was a more difficult climb for me than the Grand Mesa, but I was in good spirits until the very end of the day and refused two SAGs along the way. It was my longest day ever in the saddle, 14 hours, and included a few gravel sections that nearly did in my recently uncasted right wrist. That was the year I'd taken a good spill on my bike and sported a cast just six weeks before the tour. Bumpy gravel roads, of which the route sported many that year, took a distinct toll on my wrist. This would be a fun ride to try again when I'm 100%.

Pikes Peak

Pikes Peak is the most difficult ride I've ever done, and both attempts, I failed to summit. Assault on The Peak was a timed event (not part of Ride the Rockies); I needed 15 to 20 minutes more the first time up. I missed the finish line by less than a mile. The second time I tried, the timed event had been shaved by an hour, and I missed the first time cutoff by less than five minutes. I'd trained as thoroughly as I possibly could. Pikes continues to yank on my bucket list. It's a big burr under my saddle. Now that the road is open to bicycles, perhaps Ride the Rockies could make a day of it... Wishful thinking replaces any sugar plums dancing in my head.

lame 2005 logo and no Sobe luck

A couple of years ago, I learned about a non-charity commercial ride that commandeers my daydreams and causes my knees to quiver. Colorado Climbing Camp by Lizard Head Cycling Guides does all the big stuff in one foul swoop. They conquer Trail Ridge Road, Mount Evans and Pikes Peak, the three highest paved roads in all of North America, all on one tour. Can you say, "Oh, my gosh!"

What if Ride the Rockies tackled this?!? Not a chance, I know, because 38,000 feet of climbing would be too difficult for many riders.

But I can dream, can't I???

Mount Evans Mountain Goat

15 December 2014

Snowflake Monday

10.11.12.13.14!!!

I have another "Frozen"-inspired amigurumi I'd planned to share today, but that was before I realized last Saturday was 12.13.14, the last Tic Tac Toe day for 29 years and a month. The next ascending sequential calendar day will be January 2, 2034, or 1.2.34, and then January 23, 2045 will ring in 01.23.45. Then April 5, 2067, May 6, 2078, June 7, 2089, will finish out the century. Doubt I'll be around for those last two or three.

Is your head spinning yet??? Purists don't count any of those dates because we here in America officially record our dates in double digits, MM.DD.YY. Across the pond (and for most genealogists), it's DD.MM.YY. Either way, it's a long, long wait for the next REAL ascending sequential calendar day.

Supposedly, many brides tied the knot last Saturday to mark what sticklers consider the last sequential calendar day until January 2, 2103, or 01.02.03. Remember when we did that back in 2003???

The Lizard and I celebrated Saturday's Tic Tac Toe with a marvelous bike ride along a hidden bike path leading into a quaint little wilderness area we didn't know existed. 31 miles on the 13th. One mathematical charm after another! We won't be waiting until 2034 to visit our newly discovered paradise again, that's for sure!

I then celebrated again that night by finishing the design and pattern for this snowflake at precisely 10:11 p.m. Pretty cool, eh? I have a 12.12.12 snowflake, so it only makes sense I should create a 12.13.14 snowflake, too. My finishing time was a bonus!

The next mathematically symbolic day will be February 2, 2022, or 2.2.22. We'll see if I'm still designing snowflakes then...

You may do whatever you'd like with snowflakes you make from this pattern, but you may not sell or republish the pattern. Thanks, and enjoy!

10.11.12.13.14 Snowflake

Finished Size: 7 inches from point to point
Materials: Size 10 crochet thread, size 8 crochet hook, empty pizza box, wax paper or plastic wrap, cellophane tape, water soluble school glue or desired stiffener, water, glitter, small container for glue/water mixture, paintbrush, stick pins that won't be used later for sewing, clear thread or fishing line

10.11.12.13.14 Snowflake Instructions

Make magic ring.

Round 1: Ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 4 dc in same sc, pull hook out of loop (dropped loop) and insert in 2nd ch of starting ch 2, insert in dropped loop, pull dropped loop through 2nd ch of starting ch 2 (starting popcorn stitch made), * ch 7, 5 dc in ring, pull hook out of loop (dropped loop) and insert in top loop of 1st dc of this 5/dc group, insert in dropped loop, pull dropped loop through top loop of 1st dc (popcorn stitch made); repeat from * around 4 times; ch 3, 1 tr in starting popcorn to form 6th ch 7 sp of Round. Pull magic circle tight enough to make popcorn stitches poufy.

Round 2: 4 sc over post of tr directly below; * ch 3, 4 sc in next ch 7 sp, ch 3, 4 sc in same sp; repeat from * around 4 times; ch 3, 4 sc in next ch 7 sp, ch 1, 1 dc in starting sc to form 6th ch 3 tip of Round.
If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original.

Round 3: Ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc over post of dc directly below, * ch 15, 1 dc in 7th ch from hook, [ch 3, sk next 3 ch, 1 dc in next ch] 2 times, 2 dc in same ch 3 sp, ch 6, sk next ch 3 sp, 2 dc in next ch 3 sp; repeat from * around 5 times, omitting last ch 6 and last 2 dc of final repeat; ch 3, 1 tr in 2nd ch of starting ch 2 to form 6th ch 6 sp of Round.

Round 4: Ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), *3 dc in next ch 3 sp, ch 3, 3 dc in same sp, 4 sc in next ch 3 sp, 3 dc in next ch 6 tip, ch 3, 3 dc in same sp, ch 3, 2 dc in 3rd ch from hook, ch 6, 1 dc in 4th ch from hook, 1 hdc in next ch, 1 sc in next ch, ch 3, 2 dc in 3rd ch from hook, 3 dc in same ch 6 tip, ch 3, 3 dc in same sp, 4 sc in next ch 3 sp, 3 dc in next ch 3 sp, ch 3, 3 dc in same sp, 1 dc in next ch 6 sp; repeat from * around 5 times, omitting last dc of final repeat; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2; bind off. Weave in ends.

Finish: Tape wax paper or plastic wrap to top of empty pizza box. Pin snowflake to box on top of wax paper or plastic wrap.

A link to the new blocking template I began using when the old one disappeared is located here. I also have a link to this new (to me) site on my sidebar to the right. I try to keep all the important links there so everyone will be able to find the information they need.

If using glue, mix a few drops of water with a teaspoon of glue in small washable container. Paint snowflake with glue mixture or desired stiffener. Sprinkle lightly with glitter. Wash paintbrush and container thoroughly. Allow snowflake to dry at least 24 hours. Remove pins. Gently peel snowflake from wax paper or plastic wrap. Attach 10-inch clear thread to one spoke, weaving in end. Wrap fishing line around tree branch (or tape to ceiling or any overhead surface) and watch the snowflake twirl freely whenever you walk by! Snowflake also may be taped to window or tied to doorknob or cabinet handle.

12.13.14 Sunrise
12.13.14 Sunrise

12.13.14 ride and adventure extraordinaire
12.13.14 Bicycle Adventure Extraordinaire (story and photos to come)

12 December 2014

Cleanly Fade Away

Brand New

I don't know about you, but I don't know that "whiskers" on my jeans are that important.

Yahoo Style recently declared jeans should not be washed, but frozen (right alongside your food, mind you!!!), and simply spritzed with vodka if any dirty spots or smells remain. To wash jeans ruins the intended natural fading of lines radiating from the crotch, they claim. I kid you not! Read the linked story above if you don't believe me!!!

I've been washing jeans, not just mine, but for the whole family in every family I've been a member of, for pushing nearly half a century now. I recycle the denim every chance I get when knees, saddles, seams or pockets wear thin. I get many, many miles out of the recycled denim, as well, and I'm washing it just like I wash the jeans. Soap and water. Washing machine and dryer. Shrink them babies. Fade 'em, too. Soften the cotton.

My husband's grandfathers and uncles worked on their farms, and they wore jeans. I guarantee you they did not put their jeans in any ice box. And jeans would not have been worn dirty week after week after week. No children and grandchildren would have resulted if those cowboys had displayed such fashion sense. Wives would have abandoned those stinky cowboys lickety split.

Denim whiskers, indeed!

whiskers

11 December 2014

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