09 February 2016

Tangerine Orange Dreams


Saturday's Orange and Blue Sunset

Last Friday was our annual Super Bowl Chili Cook-off at work. My co-workers renamed my orange spice entry. We had a ball. The chili was awesome. Sunday's game was even better! It's only the second time in about 18 years I've been able to watch a football game. I haven't watched any other games this season because I didn't want to jinx my team.

We'd planned to spend the Super Bowl weekend cross-country skiing, but as luck would have it, it turned out to be our turn with four other families to clean the church. That's what I get for having a last name that starts with an A. Ha ha!

We wouldn't have been able to watch the Super Bowl if we'd gone back to the Grand Mesa. We'd have been driving home and would have missed the entire game.

This is about the funniest reason I've ever been thankful to be a member of my church!







































08 February 2016

Snowflake Monday


Most of the patterns I post are prepared three to four weeks in advance. Today's pattern was written yesterday afternoon while a certain football team made orange the new black. Thanks for the inspiration, Denver Broncos!

You may do whatever you'd like with snowflakes and snowflake frames you make from this pattern, but you may not sell or republish the pattern. Feel free to make them in your own favorite team color(s)!


Finished Size: 5.5 inches from point to point, 2.5-inch opening
Materials: Size 10 crochet thread, size 7 crochet hook, empty pizza box, wax paper or plastic wrap, cellophane tape, water soluble school glue or desired stiffener, water, glitter, small container for glue/water mixture, paintbrush, stick pins that won't be used later for sewing, clear thread or fishing line

Vitamin C Snowflake Frame Instructions

Ch 54. Taking care not to twist ch, sl st in starting ch.

Round 1: Ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 1 dc in each of next 8 ch, * ch 3, 1 dc in each of next 9 dc; repeat from * around 5 times; ch 1, 1 dc in 2nd ch of starting ch 2 to form 6th ch 3 sp of Round.

Round 2: Ch 5 (counts as 1 dc and ch 3), 1 dc over post of dc directly below, * 1 dc in each of next 2 dc, sk next 2 dc, 7 dc in next dc, skip next 2 dc, 1 dc in each of next 2 dc, 1 dc in next ch 3 sp, ch 3, 1 dc in same sp (V-stitch made), ch 5, 1 dc in same ch 3 sp, ch 3, 1 dc in same sp (V-stitch made); repeat from * around 5 times, omitting last V-st and ch 5 of final repeat; ch 2, 1 tr in 2nd ch of starting ch 5 to form 6th ch 5 tip of Round.
If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original.

Round 3: Ch 5 (counts as 1 dc and ch 3), 1 dc over post of tr directly below, * 1 dc in next ch 3 sp, ch 3 1 dc in same sp (V-stitch made), V-st in gap between next 2/dc and 7/dc groups, sk next 3 dc of 7/dc shell, 1 dc in middle (4th) dc of 7/dc shell, ch 5, 1 dc in same dc, ski next 3 dc of 7/dc shell, V-stitch in gap between 7/dc shell and next 2/dc group, V-st stitch in next ch 3 sp, V-stitch in next ch 5 tip, ch 9, V-stitch in same tip, V-stitch in next ch 3 sp; repeat from * around 5 times, ending with ch 9 tip on final repeat; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 5; bind off. Weave in ends.

Finish: Tape wax paper or plastic wrap to top of empty pizza box. Pin snowflake to box on top of wax paper or plastic wrap.

If using glue, mix a few drops of water with a teaspoon of glue in small washable container. Paint snowflake with glue mixture or desired stiffener. Sprinkle lightly with glitter. Wash paintbrush and container thoroughly. Allow snowflake to dry at least 24 hours. Remove pins. Gently peel snowflake from wax paper or plastic wrap. Attach 10-inch clear thread to one spoke, weaving in end. Wrap fishing line around tree branch (or tape to ceiling or any overhead surface) and watch snowflake twirl freely whenever you walk by! Snowflake also may be taped to window or tied to doorknob or cabinet handle.




To frame photo, ALWAYS use a copy. Never use a sole original or valuable photo in a snowflake ornament.

Place stiffened snowflake over desired photo COPY and adjust position to center subject. Make small mark around edges of photo between dc gaps of 2nd Round. Remove snowflake and cut photo COPY in a circular or hexagonal shape along marks. Run a small bead of glue along outer edge of top of photo COPY, and carefully replace snowflake, taking care not to smear glue on photo. Glue smears will show, even after they dry. Allow to dry thoroughly. Hang or gift as desired.

06 February 2016

Snowflake Saturday


Once again, I'm celebrating Snowflake Day/Make a Snowflake Day, this time with a project of epic proportions, in every sense of the word. Yes, I know. People want to ban the word "epic." And for good reason. But none of the synonyms (i.e., ambitious, classic, impressive, grand, marathon, etc...) carry the same weight for what my husband and I have built.


One of the favorite things my siblings and I loved to sneak off to do when we were very young was climb onto the top shelf of the closet in the boys' room, where we would color with crayons on the turned-on bare closet light bulb and let the melted wax drips splash onto paper on the floor below. As we gained experience balancing on the closet shelf, we'd hold the paper right below the light bulb and blow on the wax for a splattered look.

Mom caught us one day, probably because we were being way too quiet, a deadly thing when you have seven kids under the age of 12 in the house.

The lecture we got from Mom was enough to keep us from playing with light bulbs ever again. Then Dad got home from work. Dad is an electrical engineer. We were in BIG trouble.

I've been afraid of light bulbs as toys ever since!

I've been enamored with the crocheted lamp globes I've been seeing around the internet for more than five years. One of my readers, Susan, even crafted one for me of my own snowflake patterns several years ago. I've been afraid to put a light bulb inside it. Yet I love it!


Flash photography has forced me to become a little more comfortable working with lights. LEDs seem to be a safer light source than the light bulbs of my childhood. Even I enjoy light painting with fiber optic LEDs!


According to Matt, crochet and lights may indeed be safely mixed. Matt's glorious flower lamp inspired today's project. THANK YOU, MATT!!!


I give you fair warning: this is a pricey project. The IKEA lamp I ordered (because I didn't want to brave Christmas shopping crowds in November when I first decided to make this lamp) is not cheap, and postage was practically outrageous. (But far better than spending a winter Saturday on crowded highways, in a crowded and likely snowy parking lot, wandering a Christmas-shopper-crowded store and standing in line at that crowded store to pay for one lamp.)

So, an expensive project, yet whenever I look at this gorgeous lamp, it's worth every dime that went into it. I might even have to make another one with blue snowflakes. Maybe I'll even make one with my crocheted flowers...


Another warning: This is not an overnight project. Although snowflakes work up quickly, they need to be stiffened, and this project requires a whole lot of them.

When I first began this project, before I ordered the lamp, I thought I'd need 84 snowflakes because Matt used 84 flowers.

I didn't know my lamp is bigger than what Matt used to make his project. My lamp required 157 snowflakes!!! That's nearly double what I'd expected! At one point, I realized I had to make at least 20 snowflakes a week to get this project done in time for today. Oh, did I mention today is the second annual Snowflake Day? Happy Snowflake Day!


Feel free to join in Snowflake Ball activities at Sisters of the Snowflake!

I had to make far more snowflakes than what I expected, but just look at this lamp now. Don't you think it was worth every single crochet loop???


One last word of warning. This project requires assembly, and lots of it. Perhaps if you buy the lamp in the IKEA store, you can get one already put together. I don't know because I've never been inside an IKEA. Assembly really didn't bother us, but I acknowledge there are crocheters who don't want to stiffen snowflakes, much less build a lamp that sometimes pretends to be a slinky or sporadically auditions for the role of a bunch of skinny tangled knitting needles.

By the time I glued on the final snowflake, this project had taken me nearly three months start to finish. But again, just take a look at it. This is the best thing my husband and I have ever built. So far. I think it was more than worth everything we put into it. Don't you?

If we ever sell our house, this baby comes with us!


Today's snowflake pattern is the final flake I crafted specifically for our lamp. I needed 20 more snowflakes for the top rounds, and all needed to be small. We were driving home from cross-country skiing up Mill Creek, and I wanted to be done with snowflakes and with white for a good long while. I made all 20 snowflakes in that one four-hour drive!

This is my favorite of that joyous snowflake cramming session. I'm not sure there is a word to describe the joy I felt as I bound off this snowflake!

You may do whatever you'd like with snowflakes you make from this pattern, but you may not sell or republish the pattern. Thanks, and enjoy!

Finished Size: 2.75 inches from point to point
Materials: Size 10 crochet thread, size 8 crochet hook, empty pizza box, wax paper or plastic wrap, cellophane tape, glue, water, glitter, small container for glue/water mixture, paintbrush, stick pins that won't be used later for sewing, clear thread or fishing line


Blissful Snowflake Instructions

Make magic ring.

Round 1: Ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 4 dc in ring, take loop off hook, insert hook through 2nd ch of starting ch 2 and replace loop on hook, pull loop through ch (popcorn stitch made), * ch 3; 5 dc in ring, take loop off hook, insert hook through top loop of 1st dc and replace loop on hook, pull loop through top of 1st dc (popcorn stitch made); repeat from * 4 times; ch 1, 1 dc in top of starting popcorn to form 6th ch 3 sp of Round. Pull magic circle tight.

Round 2: Ch 2 (counts as 1 dc), 2 dc over post of dc directly below, * 3 dc in next ch 3 sp, ch 5, sl st in 3rd ch from hook and in each of next 2 ch, ch 7, sl st in3rd ch from hook and in each of next 4 ch, ch 5, sl st in 3rd ch from hook and in each of next 2 ch, 3 dc in same ch 3 sp; repeat from * around 5 times, omitting last 3 dc of final repeat; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2; bind off. Weave in ends.
Please go here to see the original.

Finish: Tape wax paper or plastic wrap to top of empty pizza box. Pin snowflake to box on top of wax paper or plastic wrap.

If using glue, mix a few drops of water with a teaspoon of glue in small washable container. Paint snowflake with glue mixture or desired stiffener. Sprinkle lightly with glitter. Wash paintbrush and container thoroughly. Allow snowflake to dry at least 24 hours. Remove pins. Gently peel snowflake from wax paper or plastic wrap. Attach 10-inch clear thread to one spoke, weaving in end. Wrap fishing line around tree branch (or tape to ceiling or any overhead surface) and watch the snowflake twirl freely whenever you walk by! Snowflake also may be taped to window or tied to doorknob or cabinet handle.




Lamp Assembly: Assemble and hang lamp as directed in manufacturer's instructions, but don't snap the paper flowers into place. Remove the plastic snap centers from the paper flowers. Glue one snowflake to each snap center. (I used Elmer's Glue-All, NOT the water soluble school glue.) Allow glue to dry thoroughly. (I let each set dry overnight.) Snap snowflakes onto lamp. (I started at the bottom and worked my way up. My sleeves often would catch on the lower snowflakes and dislodge them as I snapped upper snowflakes into place, resulting in another night of gluing and drying before reapplying. Working from the top down might be a smarter way to complete this lamp.)

After you finish snapping snowflakes into place, make sure you have a lot of room on your camera's memory card, because you're going to need it! More photos next Wordless Wednesday!



How Cool is that?!?

05 February 2016

Friday Funny

Leggos... ha ha ha ha ha!

Snowflake Friday


One more tiny snowflake for the top of my special project, which will be announced tomorrow (Joy! Joy! Joy!), and I'd be done, done, done! No more white for a while, no more snowflakes for a while, but let me tell you, boy, oh boy, did my camera ever get a workout when I finished my favorite project so far!

It's SO tempting to share a photo of it with you today!!!

"Patience, Gwasshoppa, patience," The Lizard always says when I'm so excited I could nearly burst into a multi-colored fireworks blast.

Patience. A very big word for a very tiny snowflake!

Tomorrow you'll find out why I needed so many little snowflakes. Be sure to tune in! And be sure to join Snowflake Ball festivities at Sisters of the Snowflake.

Oh, and besides tomorrow being Ride the Rockies route announcement day, it also is Eat Ice Cream for Breakfast Day. That's right! You heard it right here on Snowcatcher! You have my permission! Don't let this treasured opportunity pass you by!


You may do whatever you'd like with snowflakes you make from this pattern, but you may not sell or republish the pattern. Thanks, and enjoy!

Finished Size: 2.5 inches from point to point
Materials: Size 10 crochet thread, size 7 crochet hook, empty pizza box, wax paper or plastic wrap, cellophane tape, water soluble school glue or desired stiffener, water, glitter, small container for glue/water mixture, paintbrush, stick pins that won't be used later for sewing, clear thread or fishing line


Patience Snowflake Instructions

Foundation Round: Ch 6, sl st in 4th ch from hook (picot made); [ch 5, sl st in 4th ch from hook] 4 times; ch 3, 1 tr in2nd ch from hook AND 1st ch of starting ch 6, taking care not to twist picot chain, to form 6th picot and join loop.
If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original.

Round 1: Ch 4 (counts as 1 tr), 4 tr inside same picot, ch 3, 1 sc in 2nd ch from hook (picot made), ch 1, * 5 tr in next picot, ch 3, 1 sc in 2nd ch from hook, ch 1; repeat from * 4 times; sl st in 4th ch of starting ch 4; bind off. Weave in ends.

Finish: Tape wax paper or plastic wrap to top of empty pizza box. Pin snowflake to box on top of wax paper or plastic wrap.

If using glue, mix a few drops of water with a teaspoon of glue in small washable container. Paint snowflake with glue mixture or desired stiffener. Sprinkle lightly with glitter. Wash paintbrush and container thoroughly. Allow snowflake to dry at least 24 hours. Remove pins. Gently peel snowflake from wax paper or plastic wrap. Attach 10-inch clear thread to one spoke, weaving in end. Wrap fishing line around tree branch (or tape to ceiling or any overhead surface) and watch the snowflake twirl freely whenever you walk by! Snowflake also may be taped to window or tied to doorknob or cabinet handle.

Patience Snowflake

04 February 2016

Snowflake Thursday


I'd been working my way through some of my stashed snowflake patterns in order to make enough snowflakes for my special project, which will be announced on Saturday. Just two more days!!! Can you believe it?!?

(By the way, don't forget to check out the fun at Sisters of the Snowflake, where the second annual Snowflake Day will be celebrated with a Snowflake Ball!)

Some of the old patterns didn't have names. Some had only the color of thread I'd used for the prototype, presumably for name inspiration when I picked up the pattern again. This snowflake was going to be easy because, to me, shades of light blue are perfect for a snowflake.

This pattern had more than just the thread color, though: "Light blue spirals with thicker thread," I'd written. (Size 5 crochet thread.) This baby had a story to go along with it! So I'm keeping the original name!!! Here's the story, which I don't even remember writing, much less dreaming, all these years later:

"Dreamed this pattern in detail the same night I dreamed we were aboard an African slave ship and being ordered to take care of a bigger ship by the evil admiral of both ships.

"I dreamed the evil admiral stole all my thread to keep us in bondage, and The Lizard kept assuring me we'd get it all back. The admiral sabotaged our ship somehow, and all the pop cans started firing like cannon balls because they were under severe pressure.

"We opened a window and let one of the pop cans fire into the bigger ship, and then The Lizard took one of my crochet hooks and sabotaged the big ship by sticking the hook in the engine to jam it.

"All the slaves laughed and waved as we kept sailing right on by the evil ship while the evil admiral cursed at us and shook his fist."


Not quite Pirates of the Caribbean, which according to my notes we had not watched recently, but that movie must have harbored at least a degree of inspiration for this pattern. Let's hope I dream more ship dreams! Let's watch Pirates all over again, Lizard! (Or Horatio Hornblower...)

The Lizard had watched Jaws, which has ships, while I worked on snowflakes the night before I dreamed this dream, and my then-boss was flying to Africa on the following Friday. Perhaps that explains where this crazy came from?

Naaa... Let's go with inspiration via Jack Sparrow!

You may do whatever you'd like with snowflakes you make from this pattern, but you may not sell or republish the pattern. Thanks, and enjoy!


Finished Size: 4 inches from point to point
Materials: Size 10 crochet thread, size 7 crochet hook, empty pizza box, wax paper or plastic wrap, cellophane tape, water soluble school glue or desired stiffener, water, glitter, small container for glue/water mixture, paintbrush, stick pins that won't be used later for sewing, clear thread or fishing line

NOTE: See Moogly's Tall Stitch Chart here.

African Spiral Snowflake Instructions

Make magic ring.

Round 1: * 1 sc in ring, ch 5; repeat from * around 4 times; 1 sc in ring, 1 tr in starting sc (tr counts as final ch 5 loop, and you will be working over tr post as if it was a loop sp in next round). Don't pull magic ring too tight.

Round 2: Ch 2, 2 dc over post of tr directly below, ch 2, sl st into same sp, * ch 4, 3 dc in next ch 5 loop, ch 2, sl st into same sp; repeat from * around 4 times; 1 tr into 2nd ch of starting ch 2 (tr counts as final ch 4 sp).

Round 3: Ch 2, 2 dc over post of tr directly below, ch 2, sl st into same sp, * ch 5, 3 dc in next ch 4 sp, ch 2, sl st into same sp; repeat from * around 4 times; 1 dtr into 2nd ch of starting ch 2 (dtr counts as final ch 5 sp).

Round 4: Ch 2, 2 dc over post of dtr directly below, ch 2, sl st into same sp, * ch 6, 3 dc in next ch 5 sp, ch 2, sl st into same sp; repeat from * around 4 times; 1 trtr into 2nd ch of starting ch 2 (trtr counts as final ch 6 sp).
If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original.

Round 5: Ch 2, 2 dc over post of trtr directly below, ch 2, sl st into same sp, * ch 7, 3 dc into next ch 6 sp, ch 2, sl st into same sp; repeat from * around 4 times; 1 quadtr into 2nd ch of starting ch 2 (quadtr counts as final ch 7 sp).

Round 6: Ch 2, 2 dc over post of qtr directly below, ch 2, sl st into same sp, * ch 8, 3 dc into next ch 7 sp, ch 2, sl st into same sp; repeat from * around 4 times; 1 quintr into 2nd ch of starting ch 2 (quintr counts as final ch 8 sp).

Round 7: Ch 2, 2 dc over post of quintr directly below, 3 hdc in same sp, 3 sc in same sp, ch 7, * 3 dc in next ch 8 sp, 3 hdc in same sp, 3 sc in same sp, ch 5; repeat from * around 4 times; sl st in 2nd ch of starting ch 2; bind off. Weave in ends.




Finish: Tape wax paper or plastic wrap to top of empty pizza box. Pin snowflake to box on top of wax paper or plastic wrap.

If using glue, mix a few drops of water with a teaspoon of glue in small washable container. Paint snowflake with glue mixture or desired stiffener. Sprinkle lightly with glitter. Wash paintbrush and container thoroughly. Allow snowflake to dry at least 24 hours. Remove pins. Gently peel snowflake from wax paper or plastic wrap. Attach 10-inch clear thread to one spoke, weaving in end. Wrap fishing line around tree branch (or tape to ceiling or any overhead surface) and watch the snowflake twirl freely whenever you walk by! Snowflake also may be taped to window or tied to doorknob or cabinet handle.

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