22 April 2013

Snowflake Monday

Handies Peak

Sometimes while I'm trying to use up tiny scraps of thread, I come up with what I think is a great idea for a one-round snowflake, but there are too many stitches for a tiny flake. After I finish off the thread scraps, I try again with a bigger center and a bigger supply of thread. Sometimes, the second flake comes out better than the first!

Sometimes the first flake isn't too bad once I get it pinned out. Today I present a double whammy because I like both variations. And I finished off two short thread remnants in the process!

end of the string

Because this is such a handy little pair of patterns, I've named them after one of the 14ers in my favorite part of the state: Handies Peak.

There is no record of how 14,048-foot Handies got such a handy name, but according to speculation, "Handie" may have been one of the early pioneers or surveyors along Cinnamon Pass. The name was already in place prior to the Hayden survey in 1874. If the U.S. Forest Service had its way, the peak would have been named Tabasco, after the Tabasco Meat Sauce Company that financed a prolific silver mine near Handies.

Handies Peak is the highest point managed by the Bureau of Land Management outside of Alaska. It's also the highest point of the Hardrock 100-mile foot race, which features 33,992 feet of climbing. !!! Now, THAT's Tabasco!!!

No, I have never done the Hardrock 100, and I have no interest whatsoever in running 100 miles anywhere. Give me a bike, and we're on. But 100 miles of trail running: My knee would not survive.

Nevertheless, I have been atop the gorgeous summit of Handies. It was such a fun and beautiful climb, I would handily do it again someday in order to photograph participants in the Hardrock 100.

Handies Peak

Handies Peak

Redcloud Peak and Sunshine Peak and DIA-looking sastrugi from the summit of Handies Peak

You may do whatever you'd like with snowflakes you make from this pattern, but you may not sell or republish the pattern. Thanks, and enjoy!

Handies and Tabasco

Finished Size: Handies Peak Snowflake, 2 inches from point to point; Tabasco Peak Snowflake, 3 inches from point to point
Materials: Size 10 crochet thread, size 8 crochet hook, empty pizza box, wax paper or plastic wrap, cellophane tape, water soluble school glue or desired stiffener, water, glitter, small container for glue/water mixture, paintbrush, stick pins that won't be used later for sewing, clear thread or fishing line

Handies Peak Snowflake Instructions

Make magic ring.

Round 1: * 1 sc in ring, ch 8, 1 sc in ring, ch 5; repeat from * 4 times; 1 sc in ring, ch 8, 1 sc in ring, ch 2, 1 tr in starting sc to form last ch 5 sp of round. Don’t pull magic ring too tight.
If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original.

Round 2: 2 sc over post of tr just worked, * ch 1, 2 dc in next ch 8 sp, ch 3, sl st in 3rd ch from hook, 2 dc in same sp, ch 1, 3 sc in next ch 5 sp; repeat from * around 5 times, omitting last 2 sc of final repeat; sl st in starting sc; bind off. Weave in ends.

Muy caliente!

Tabasco Peak Snowflake Instructions

Make magic ring.

Round 1: 12 sc in ring; sl st in starting sc. Pull magic circle tight.

Round 2: Ch 4 (counts as 1 dc and ch 2), * 1 dc in next sc, ch 2; repeat from * around 10 times; 1 dc in next sc, ch 1, 1 hdc in 2nd ch of starting ch 4 to form last ch 2 sp of round.
If you're not reading this pattern on Snowcatcher, you're not reading the designer's blog. Please go here to see the original.

Round 3: 1 sc over post of hdc just worked, ch 8, 1 sc in next ch 2 sp, * ch 5, 1 sc in next ch 2 sp, ch 8, 1 sc in next ch 2 sp; repeat from * around 4 times; ch 2, 1 tr in starting sc to form last ch 5 sp of round.

Round 4: 2 sc over post of tr just worked, * ch 1, 3 dc in next ch 8 sp, ch 5, 1 sc in 4th ch from hook, ch 6, sl st in sc, ch 4, sl st in sc (tri-picot made), 3 dc in same ch 8 sp, ch 1, 3 sc in next ch 5 sp; repeat from * around 5 times, omitting last 2 sc of final repeat; sl st in starting sc; bind off. Weave in ends. Weave in ends.

Finish: Tape wax paper or plastic wrap to top of empty pizza box. Pin snowflake to box on top of wax paper or plastic wrap.

A link to the blocking template I use is located here. That website has some of the most helpful snowflake information I know of. I also have a link to it on my sidebar to the right. I try to keep all the important links there so everyone will be able to find the information they need.

If using glue, mix a few drops of water with a teaspoon of glue in small washable container. Paint snowflake with glue mixture or desired stiffener. Sprinkle lightly with glitter. Wash paintbrush and container thoroughly. Allow snowflake to dry at least 24 hours. Remove pins. Gently peel snowflake from wax paper or plastic wrap. Attach 10-inch clear thread to one spoke, weaving in end. Wrap fishing line around tree branch (or tape to ceiling or any overhead surface) and watch the snowflake twirl freely whenever you walk by! Snowflake also may be taped to window or tied to doorknob or cabinet handle.

Tabasco Snowflake

Hot Rocks

13 comments:

  1. I love tabasco and your version of it :)

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Neferi! We love spicy, too!

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  2. The tabasco one really stands out, and great shots too as always.

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    1. Thanks, Pat! Always on a quest to try to get new and eye-popping snowflake shots!

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  3. Love the colors! Are those made with your hand-dyed thread? And, what kind of flowers are those in the first picture? They are beautiful!

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    Replies
    1. Thank you! I think the flowers are candytuft, Marigold. Two of the snowflakes are in my own hand-dye. The red hot one is a really, really old skein of discontinued thread I bought on clearance many years ago.

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  4. Very nice post, which by the title I almost didn't open, because they say another 4 to 8 or more inches of snow is on the way again for us.

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    Replies
    1. I hear you, Karen. We're collecting about a foot more here...

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  5. Sometimes one just has to try again! I think the flakes came out wonderfully.

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    Replies
    1. Thanks, Michelle. We do try to give every snowflake a productive life here, even the ones with seven sides. :)

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  6. So glad I'm not the only one who wants to use up short thread pieces ... I can't bear to waste yarn, can you? :)

    These are great flakes and great photos too ... Handies is a much friendlier name than Tabasco, I think. But the Tabasco flake is very appealing - those colours make me think of cinnamon candy.

    Wow, Colorado specialises in crazy-hard extreme sporting events. I had never heard of the Hardrock 100. How can anyone do that and survive?

    As I type this, the Hawaiian Punch photo at right keeps catching my eye. What a lovely, lovely quilt.

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